budget

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is doubling down on his commitment to renew education funding for student wellness programs saying these services can play a vital role in a student's education.

In this Nov. 28, 2018, file photo, snow covers the perimeter of the General Motors' Lordstown plant, in Lordstown, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Trump administration wants to eliminate a loan program that could help an electric vehicle maker with its plan to reopen a General Motors factory in Ohio.

In this April 16, 2018 file photo, Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference at a Kroger supermarket as the company announces new associate benefits attributed to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Starting next year, states will have the ability to use money dedicated to the opioid crisis for combatting other forms of drug use. 

Congress is set to pass a $1.4 trillion spending package this week, which President Trump has said he'll sign. The legislation includes policy changes and funding increases that public health advocates are celebrating, as well as the permanent repeal of three key taxes that were designed to pay for Obamacare — a win for industry groups.

Updated at on Dec. 17 at 2:30 p.m. ET

Congressional leaders unveiled two massive spending measures and touted key wins in the $1.3 trillion spending agreement to fund the government for the remainder of the 2020 fiscal year just days before a critical government shutdown deadline.

The House passed the spending bills with bipartisan support on Tuesday. The Senate is expected to approve both bills later this week and send them to the president for his signature.

Congressional negotiators have reached tentative agreement on a package of bills to fund the government through the end of September 2020. Lawmakers have until the end of next week to approve spending legislation to avert a government shutdown. The White House has not publicly weighed in on the agreement.

The deal covers all 12 regular spending bills, which total $1.3 trillion. This figure was agreed to in a bipartisan budget package that was enacted by the president this summer.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed a temporary spending bill to fund federal agencies, averting a possible government shutdown, according to an administration official.

The Senate passed the bill earlier Thursday, hours ahead of the midnight shutdown.

Lawmakers voted 74-20 to approve the measure to fund the government through Dec. 20. The legislative measure, known as a continuing resolution, will extend current funding levels at government agencies.

House lawmakers have introduced a temporary funding measure to thwart another government shutdown, with hopes to move the legislation to the Senate and the president's desk before federal agencies run out of money at midnight on Thursday.

The legislative measure, known as a continuing resolution, or CR, will fund the government through Dec. 20. This would mark the second continuing resolution to take effect since the fiscal year began Oct. 1.

Columbus mayor Andrew Ginther.
Andrew Welsh-Huggins / Associated Press

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther released his proposed 2020 operating budget for the city Wednesday morning. The budget totals $965 million, and represents a 5.56% increase from the previous year.

Congressional budget forecasters are predicting more red ink — nearly $1 trillion this year — as a result of the bipartisan spending agreement lawmakers struck this summer.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office now says the federal deficit will hit $960 billion in fiscal 2019 and average $1.2 trillion in each of the next 10 years.

Updated at 3:07 p.m. ET

The Senate on Thursday approved a two-year budget deal that set new spending levels and boosted the nation's borrowing authority.

The bipartisan legislation, which was approved in a 67-28 vote, raises the debt ceiling past the 2020 elections and allows $1.3 trillion for defense and domestic programs over the next two years.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jul 22, 2019
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Governor Mike DeWine signed a two-year spending plan for the state.

The $69 billion budget became law after a two week delay while lawmakers mulled their differences over tax cuts for all and tax exemptions for small businesses. 

DeWine vetoed 25 line items, including a school funding provision that he said would have unfairly benefited wealthier school districts. 

Today on All Sides, the state budget, the vetoes, and more.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Ohio would cut personal income taxes by 4%, raise the age for buying tobacco products to 21 and direct $550 million for educational wraparound services such as mental health counseling under the state budget that lawmakers belatedly sent to Gov. Mike DeWine on Wednesday, hours before their extended deadline.

 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

After 17 days of overtime budget negotiations, lawmakers in the Ohio House and Senate have reached a $69 billion two-year spending deal.

Ohio Legislature May Be Nearing Agreement On State Budget

Jul 16, 2019
Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, left, shakes hands with Ohio House speaker Larry Householder after delivering the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Lawmakers who have been negotiating Ohio's next two-year state budget were set to reconvene Tuesday, a day before the extended deadline for the House and Senate to pass the $69 billion spending plan.

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