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Birds And Climate Change

Nov 8, 2019
Mike's Birds / Flickr

Nearly two-thirds of North America’s birds could be at risk of extinction due to climate change.

According to a report from the National Audubon Society, if the global temperature rise by 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit by the year 2100, 389 species of birds around the continent will be at risk for extinction. 

In Ohio, we could see as many as 19 species of birds disappear by 2080 if the warming climate continues to persist.

Today on All Sides, climate change and its impact on birds. 

 

Guests:

Birds And Climate Change

Oct 17, 2019
Mike's Birds / Flickr

Nearly two-thirds of North America’s birds could be at risk of extinction due to climate change.

According to a report from the National Audubon Society, if the global temperature rise by 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit by the year 2100, 389 species of birds around the continent will be at risk for extinction. 

In Ohio, we could see as many as 19 species of birds disappear by 2080 if the warming climate continues to persist.

Today on All Sides, climate change and its impact on birds. 

 

Guests:

Brutus, an Eastern screech owl, shown off at an Audubon event on Oct. 10, 2019.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

New research from the National Audubon Society finds two-thirds of North American birds are at risk of extinction due to climate change.

Over the past half-century, North America has lost more than a quarter of its entire bird population, or around 3 billion birds.

That's according to a new estimate published in the journal Science by researchers who brought together a variety of information that has been collected on 529 bird species since 1970.

Bird Rescue And Rehabilitation In Ohio

Sep 19, 2019
Dick Daniels / Wikimedia Commons

Naturalist, artist and writer Julie Zickefoose in May 2017 took on the role of savior to a sick and orphaned baby Blue Jay.

In her new memoir, Zickefoose recalls the process of saving and then releasing the Jay, and also how the Jay she named Jemima saved her back. 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: Julie Zickefoose talks about her new book, "Saving Jemima: Life and Love with a Hard-Luck Jay." 

  

Guests:

A new hybrid bird species has been spotted around parks in northeast Ohio.

The bird is a type of warbler resulting from mating between Cerulean Warblers and Northern Parulas.

Park Ranger Ryan Trimbath was the first to spot the bird in 2014 while he was working for the Summit Metro Parks in Deep Lock Quarry.

He says the experience has opened his mind to when people claim to see new species.

Viktoriia Radchuk, an evolutionary ecologist at Berlin's Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, wanted to know how animals were responding to climate change.

So she scoured the results of more than 10,000 animal studies — on species from frogs to snakes, from insects to birds to mammals — looking for information on how changing environments were affecting animal behavior. Based on the available data, she decided to focus on birds in the Northern Hemisphere.

Bald eagles are no strangers to the Tri-State. The bird's range covers all of North America and nests are not uncommon along area rivers. Twice this year, they've been spotted at Winton Woods.

It was like a scene straight out of Alfred Hitchcock. Late on New Year's Eve 2010, thousands of birds rained from the sky in Beebe, Arkansas.

Some 5,000 red-winged blackbirds, European starlings, common grackles and brown-headed cowbirds suffered blunt-force trauma after colliding with cars, trees and buildings, an ornithologist from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission would tell National Geographic.

Birding Along The Cuyahoga River

May 17, 2019

It’s prime time for birding in Northeast Ohio as many species have arrived from warmer winter spots.

ideastream visited two very different places for bird watching along the Cuyahoga River as part of its series, Cuyahoga River Comeback, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the infamous fire on the water.

One lesser-known place to visit is Eldon Russell Park in Geauga County, tucked away near the edge of Burton and Troy Township. Once there, launch a kayak or canoe on the Cuyahoga River and cruise for birds.

pigeons
Couleur / Pixabay

When you visit large cities like San Francisco, Chicago or New York, pigeons are a common sight. You’ll find them nesting on window sills, walking on sidewalks and congregating in public parks.

If you don’t see them in person, the evidence of pigeons will be obvious in the droppings they leave behind, covering once-dignified statues and monuments.

Bald eagles were once almost wiped out of Ohio. Now, the state has more than 220 nesting pairs.
Jim Kaftan

A freight train chugs across a bridge high above as Cleveland Metroparks historian Karen Lakus begins a tour of what she calls the hidden valley. Not long ago, she says, this was a dump.

“It was trash and gravel, and it was completely overgrown,” she says.

Once the traditional holidays of Black Friday and Cyber Monday are over, some Americans look forward to another tradition: the annual Christmas Bird Count.  

Since 1900 birders have picked one day — sometime around Christmas — to survey as many birds as they can find in a 15 mile diameter circle.  

Birder Mike Edgerton, a member of the Greater Akron Audubon Society, says it’s been a valuable form of crowd sourcing.

Birds and Late Summer Gardening

Sep 7, 2018
Julie Zickefoose

Bird migration is beginning as late summer turns into fall. This is a great opportunity to see purple martins, barn swallows, and warblers as they make their trek south.

Julie Zickefoose, our resident naturalist and bird expert, joins us to talk about what flying beauties she's seen thus far. She’ll also tell us about her rescue of a baby bluebird.

Coming up on All Sides, late summer birding, gardening, and more.

Guests:

Each spring, barnacle geese migrate more than 1,800 miles from the Netherlands and northern Germany to their breeding grounds in parts of Russia above the Arctic Circle.

The journey north usually takes about a month, and the geese make multiple stops along the way to eat and fatten up before they lay their eggs, says Bart Nolet of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and the University of Amsterdam.

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