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background checks

The group Ohioans for Gun Safety is rolling out a new campaign that would expand background checks for gun sales, closing the so-called “Gun Show Loophole.”

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and the Ohio Highway Patrol show 430 more people died from gun related deaths in 2017 than in car accidents. Lawmakers have different ideas on what should be done to make Ohioans safer while insuring their constitutional rights to bear arms.

Reagan Tokes
Reagan Tokes / Facebook

Reagan Tokes was a 21-year-old Ohio State University student who was kidnapped, raped and murdered by a recently released felon in 2017. While part of a package of bills named for her passed last year, backers say important measures still need to be put into law.

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Ohio lawmakers are considering a long-debated bill that would roll back concealed-carry gun permit and training regulations. Some states have already passed similar controversial laws, while others have gone in the opposite direction to tighten gun sale, permit and background-check rules.

gun in holster
Eric Gay / Associated Press

Law-abiding Ohioans age 21 and older could legally carry hidden firearms without getting a permit under a proposal introduced by House Republicans and supported by GOP Gov. Mike DeWine.

The Democratic-led House Thursday approved another piece of legislation to broaden federal gun-control legislation. The bill gives the FBI more time to do background checks on gun purchasers. It comes a day after the chamber passed a bill extending the checks to private firearms sales.

Both measures face long odds at becoming law.

The latest bill would extend the time sellers have to wait before completing a gun sale. Like Wednesday's measure, it passed largely along party lines — 228 to 198.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

The House passed what advocates call the most significant gun control measure in more than two decades on Wednesday when it approved the first of two bills aimed at broadening the federal background check system for firearms purchases.

The vote on the first bill, dubbed the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019, passed largely along party lines 240 to 190 with Democrats who control the House cheering as they carried the legislation across the finish line.

The House is slated to vote Wednesday on a bill that would require background checks on all gun sales — including those that occur online or at gun shows. On Monday, a group of four CEOs sent a letter urging Congress to pass the proposal.

Updated at 6:29 p.m. ET

The new House Democratic majority is promising to do something the party avoided when it last controlled the levers of power in Washington: pass gun legislation enhancing background check requirements for all gun purchases.

Gov. John Kasich talks about the latest official fatal overdose numbers from the Ohio Department of Health at a Statehouse press conference.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich says his Medicaid department has made some changes to required background checks on behavioral and mental health providers – a requirement that came from an executive order he signed in July. The change is good news to hundreds of providers who feared for their jobs.

Hundreds of mental health and addiction counselors could lose their jobs because the state is now requiring criminal background checks for people who provide Medicaid services.

Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press

Records show more than 200 courts across Ohio failed to respond to Gov. John Kasich’s executive order seeking more information on their history with the national background check database used in stopping gun-related crimes.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich took his message for tougher gun control to the county level, signing a new executive order that urges clerks of courts and other agencies to do a better job at entering criminal information into the background check system.

Updated Feb. 3 at 4:45 p.m. ET

On Thursday the GOP-controlled House voted to overturn an Obama administration rule designed to keep firearms out of the hands of some people deemed mentally ill.

The action was the latest move by congressional Republicans to undo several of President Obama's regulations on issues such as gun control and the environment through an arcane law called the Congressional Review Act.

Federal and State Gun Background Checks

Feb 17, 2016
Michael Saechang / Flickr

President Obama has called for expanded background checks, but many are uncertain as to what the current background checks consist of. Coming up, how background checks at the state and federal level work and what the new proposals would do. 

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