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background checks

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The group pushing for expanded background checks on gun sales says the tragic mass shooting in Dayton has galvanized the state and petitioners say it's time for Ohio lawmakers to take this issue of closing the so-called "Gun Show Loophole" seriously.

Chris Dorr gestures during an 80 minute video on the Facebook page of the group he leads, Ohio Gun Owners.
Ohio Gun Owners / Facebook

The Ohio Highway Patrol is reviewing comments made by a leader of a pro-gun rights group following the unveiling of a package of gun control proposals by Gov. Mike DeWine.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

President Trump on Friday indicated that he supported new legislation on "intelligent" background checks for gun purchases after recent mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

"On background checks, we have tremendous support for really common-sense, sensible, important background checks," Trump told reporters at the White House.

The president said the issue "isn't a question of NRA, Republican or Democrat," and added that he had spoken with the head of the National Rifle Association.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

President Trump visited survivors of the shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Wednesday before heading to El Paso, Texas, the site of the weekend's other deadly violence. Trump remained out of public view during the Dayton stop.

On the ground in El Paso, Trump said, "We had an amazing day."

"The love, the respect, for the office of the presidency, it was — I wish you could have been in there to see it," he told reporters.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has said he wants input from gun rights advocates as he works on his plan to reduce gun violence, but some of Ohio's largest groups seem to be split on his proposal.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling for a version of the "Red Flag Law," expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is ignoring Democrats' efforts to pressure him into calling the Senate back from recess to vote on gun legislation to expand background checks following back to back mass shootings.

But there is movement among some Republican lawmakers, who are calling for action on some gun control measures.

President Trump went before cameras on Monday in highly anticipated remarks following the mass shootings in Ohio and Texas over the weekend. In his remarks at the White House, Trump used the words "domestic terrorism" and "white supremacy." He did not acknowledge his own rhetoric.

The president targeted violent video games and drew a connection between mass shootings and mental health, though the research does not back up his assertions.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Facing pressure to take action after the nation’s latest mass shooting, Gov. Mike DeWine urged Ohio’s GOP-led state legislature Tuesday to pass laws requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.

In the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohioans for Gun Safety says now is the time for state lawmakers to expand and strengthen background checks for gun purchases. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton, while some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
SAM ABERLE / Ohio Public Radio

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion and oppose the recently-passed “Heartbeat Bill.” 

A gun safety group has resubmitted petition language that would call for the Ohio General Assembly to pass a bill that would expand background checks for guns purchased online and at gun shows.

A gun safety group that wants to convince Ohio lawmakers to require background checks on nearly all gun sales is not giving up on its effort, though Attorney General Dave Yost rejected its first attempt. 

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

The group pushing for a law to require background checks for most gun purchases in Ohio got shot down by the state attorney general.

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