Back Pain

My back hurts when I sit down.

It's been going on for 10 years. It really doesn't matter where I am — at work, at a restaurant, even on our couch at home. My lower back screams, "Stop sitting!"

To try to reduce the pain, I bought a kneeling chair at work. Then I got a standing desk. Then I went back to a regular chair because standing became painful.

I've seen physical therapists, orthopedic surgeons and pain specialists. I've mastered Pilates, increased flexibility and strengthened muscles. At one point, my abs were so strong my husband nicknamed them "the plate."

FPS Groningen / Flickr

Bob Jones of Trumbull County has recurring pain from an old injury, but he isn’t going to be getting opioids. He never wanted them anyway, and found his own solution for pain relief. 

Chances are, you — or someone you know — has suffered from lower back pain.

It can be debilitating. It's a leading cause of disability globally.

And the number of people with the often-chronic condition is likely to increase.

To see if you're bending correctly, try a simple experiment.

"Stand up and put your hands on your waist," says Jean Couch, who has been helping people get out of back pain for 25 years at her studio in Palo Alto, Calif.

"Now imagine I've dropped a feather in front of your feet and asked to pick it up," Couch says. "Usually everybody immediately moves their heads and looks down."

A Healthier Michigan / Flickr

Fear, depression and other psychological dilemmas can all affect a patient’s ability to stop overeating and start a healthier lifestyle. With overeating contributing to more than 10% of the world’s population suffering from obesity, doctors and healthcare providers are looking for new ways to help their patients defeat overeating.  

Coming up, we're talking about overeating, how yoga can help back pain, and more fitness tips. 

chiropractor
Jim Dubel Chiropractic / Wikimedia Commons

Low back pain is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, affecting eight out of ten Americans.  Roughly $50 billion a year is spent on treatments that are meant to help relieve back pain, particularly spinal medicine, but are often ineffective or even harmful. 

Today we'll discuss back pain and the back pain industry, the benefits of walking and the healthy effects of edible weeds.