asylum | WOSU Radio

asylum

In a legal setback for the Trump administration's immigration policies, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that the government may not arbitrarily detain people seeking asylum.

The ruling comes in a case challenging the administration's policy of detaining people even after they have passed a credible fear interview and await a hearing on their asylum claim.

Immigration Policy Separating Parents from Children

May 10, 2018
Edith Espinal speaks to an audience at Columbus Mennonite Church.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

On Monday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a "zero tolerance" policy for immigrants entering the country without documentation. 

As a result of similar recent federal actions, immigrant parents have been separated from their children -- often U.S. citizens -- and have been forced to turn to other avenues for support, including churches.

One such religious institution includes the Columbus Mennonite Church, which recently allowed Edith Espinal of Mexico to be the first undocumented immigrant to take sanctuary in Ohio's capital. 

Today we discuss the consequences of the new administration's immigration policies on families and on U.S. attorneys who anticipate a further decrease in the amount of time they can spend prosecuting major crimes. 

At a busy office in central Rome, the man who oversees Italy's national network of committees that process asylum requests sits behind a desk with tall piles of folders.

Angelo Trovato says each committee has three members — representing police, local authorities and the United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR.

"Each applicant is interviewed by one committee member," says Trovato. "But when it comes to deciding the destiny of an individual, the decision can't be by a single person. It must be reached collectively."

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