Army Corps of Engineers

christmas tree with lights
Conger Design / Pixabay

Central Ohioans can give their natural Christmas trees a second life at the bottom of Alum Creek Lake. From now until January 10, the Army Corps of Engineers is accepting donations and sinking them in the lake to create fish habitats.

After three months of record high water, Lake Erie water levels are starting their seasonal decline, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

“Lake Erie did establish new record highs for the month of May, for the month of June and the month of July,” said Keith Kompoltowicz, Chief of Watershed Hydrology for the Corps’ Detroit District office. “The June monthly mean is the highest recorded level over the past 100 years. So it has never been higher in any month going back to 1918.”

In Florida, the Army Corps of Engineers is working to combat a growing environmental menace: blue-green algae. Nitrogen and phosphorus runoff from farms and subdivisions combines with warm summer weather to create massive blooms of algae in rivers and lakes that can be toxic.

Erik Drost / Flickr

A $126 million plan to put six wind turbines in Lake Erie is one step closer to winning final approval. 

Mark Urycki / ideastream

The Army Corps of Engineers is looking to protect its southern flank from invasive species. It’s putting up $2 million to stop the Asian carp and other species from getting any farther north than Akron.

Ohio and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have settled a lawsuit over dredging in the Cuyahoga River.  

The state and the federal agency have fought for years over how to handle sediment scooped from the river. The Army Corps wanted to dump it into Lake Erie, but the state said that was unsafe.

Under the settlement, the Army Corps will bear the cost of disposing of sediment dredged in 2016 and 2017. That material was placed in confined disposal facilities, not in the lake.

The settlement was filed Wednesday in federal court in Cleveland.

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.