archaeology

A team of American archaeologists has discovered two large ancient Greek royal tombs dating back some 3,500 years near the site of the ancient city of Pylos in southern Greece. The findings cast a new light on the role of the ancient city — mentioned in Homer's Odyssey — in Mediterranean trade patterns of the Late Bronze Age.

Each of the two tombs — one about 39 feet in diameter and the other about 28 feet — was built in a dome-shape structure known as a tholos.

A Cleveland researcher has been named to the list of “10 People Who Mattered in Science” for 2019 by the prestigious journal Nature.

Scientists say they have found the oldest known figurative painting, in a cave in Indonesia. And the stunning scene of a hunting party, painted some 44,000 years ago, is helping to rewrite the history of the origins of art.

Until recently, the long-held story was that humans started painting in caves in Europe. For example, art from the Chauvet Cave in France is dated as old as 37,000 years.

A recent effort to preserve a historic Native American earthwork in Butler County points to a broader effort to recognize and honor Ohio's early mound builders. Eight ancient earthworks sites dating to the Hopewell era comprise the USA's first Ohio-centric bid for UNESCO World Heritage Site status.

Just outside Durango, Colo., archeologist Rand Greubel stands on a mesa surrounded by juniper trees. He points to a circular hole in the ground, about 30 feet across and more than 8 feet deep. There's a fire pit in the center of an earthen floor, ventilation shafts tunneled into the side walls and bits of burned thatching that suggest how the structure once continued to rise above the ground. It's a large pit house from what's known as the Pueblo I period.

"We knew right away that it was highly significant just because of the sheer size of it," Greubel says.

There's an element of excitement surrounding Fortified Hill, a Ross Township earthwork, after supporters were able to raise the money to save it in just over a month.

A team of researchers led by Cleveland Museum of Natural History Curator and Case Western Reserve University Adjunct Professor Yohannes Haile-Selassie found a previously unknown early human ancestor in the Afar region of Ethiopia that could change the way scientists view human evolution.

Courtesy of Ohio History Connection

A judge in Licking County granted the Ohio History Connection’s petition for full access to a portion of land near Newark.

Dayton has hired a national consulting firm that city officials say specializes in cultural and historic preservation to conduct testing at the site of a proposed National Football League-funded field.

The recently announced NFL project at Triangle Park has been on hold for more than a week after some Native American groups warned the park is home to Native burial remains. 

The National Football League announced it would sponsor construction of a new professional-quality turf football field at Triangle Park as part of the league’s centennial season.

The jawbone of a little-known form of ancient human has been discovered in western China. Scientists say these people lived as long as 150,000 years ago, and they were part of a group called Denisovans.

The Denisovans are a mystery. Up until now, their only remains — a few bone fragments and teeth — came from a cave called Denisova in Siberia.

The Cultural Significance Of Ohio Archaeological Sites

Apr 29, 2019
Courtesy of Ohio History Connection

The fire at Notre Dame this month shook the Western world, with billionaires pledging millions of dollars towards its restoration. 

The 13th century cathedral is an important cultural, historical, and religious symbol of Western Civilization.

Back in Ohio, however, culturally rich archaeological sites dating back more than a thousand years before Notre Dame are legally bulldozed. 

Today on All Sides, a closer look at Ohio’s ancient structures, who built them and how they shape the cultural identity of the state. 

Tiny bits of blue pigment found in the teeth of a medieval skeleton reveal that more than 850 years ago, this seemingly ordinary woman was very likely involved in the production of lavishly illustrated sacred texts.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Bret Ruby trudges up a slight rise at the Hopeton Earthworks, one of six sites that make up the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ruby serves as Hopewell’s archaeologist, and he wears the dark green uniform and flat brimmed hat of the National Park Service.

Over the past 125,000 years, the average size of mammals on the Earth has shrunk. And humans are to blame.

That's the conclusion of a new study of the fossil record by paleo-biologist Felisa Smith of the University of New Mexico.

In Alaska, scientists have uncovered something they say is remarkable: the remains of two infants dating back more than 11,000 years.

Their discovery is evidence of the earliest wave of migration into the Americas.

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