anti-semitism

The Anti-Defamation League has released its annual report of anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. for 2017.

Last year marked the largest single-year increase nationwide since the ADL began tracking incidents in the late ‘70s. Ohio ranked 19th in the nation with 26 anti-Semitic incidents reported last year. In terms of per capita incidents, Ohio ranked in the lower half of states at number 34.

The Anti-Defamation League has identified 1,986 anti-Semitic incidents in its 2017 Audit of Anti-Semitic Incidents. That's up from 1,267 in 2016, marking the highest single-year increase since the organization released its first audit in 1979.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Just a day before Jews celebrate one of their holiest days, Yom Kippur, an Ohio lawmaker is drawing attention to a resolution that condemns a protest movement on college campuses.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Sunday marks the culmination of one discussion among Jews and Muslims in Northeast Ohio -- and the start of another one. The local dialogue predates Charlottesville, the Muslim travel ban and the election of Donald Trump.

A Jewish advocacy organization expects a staggering increase in anti-Semitic incidents by the end of 2017. That projection comes after the Anti-Defamation League counted an 86 percent spike in attacks on Jews and Jewish institutions so far this year, according to a report released Monday.

Jewish Community Center of Columbus

In the last two months, over 100 Jewish centers across the country have received bomb threats, including the Jewish Community Center of Columbus. On Friday, Senator Rob Portman visited with leaders of Ohio's Jewish community to condemn these attacks as un-American and call for a firm response.
 

The Department of Homeland Security is stepping up its support for Jewish institutions across the nation who've received more than 120 bomb threats in the past two months. Jewish Community Centers have been pressing for help as they've been targeted by waves of threatening calls as well as vandalism.

Since January, the calls coming in to JCCs have been both vivid and unnerving. Betzy Lynch, executive director of the JCC in Birmingham, Ala., got three of the threatening calls, all very similar.