anti-semitism | WOSU Radio

anti-semitism

The streets of Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood are usually busy with Hasidic families coming and going. The men and boys wear distinctive hats and beards and side curls known as peyots. Esther and Yehuda Weiss have lived here all their lives. They've been shaken by recent anti-Semitic harassment and violence.

"We all get worried and scared," Yehuda says.

Esther sets out a bowl of sugared nuts and sits across from her husband. "It's getting very scary, and it's putting a lot of our stress on our daily lives."

Updated at 3:16 p.m. ET

Federal prosecutors in New York have filed hate crime charges against the man accused of carrying out a stabbing rampage north of New York City over the weekend that wounded five people as they celebrated Hanukkah.

Facing a rash of anti-Semitic attacks, the New York City Police Department will increase its presence in Brooklyn neighborhoods that have large Jewish communities, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Friday.

At least six incidents of hate-fueled attacks have been reported over the past week. The violence is taking place against the backdrop of Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of lights, which began Sunday evening.

Updated at 6:18 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday that will make Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act apply to anti-Semitic acts. The order is generating concern that it will stifle free speech by those who oppose Israel's policy toward the Palestinians.

The executive order takes indirect aim at the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement that has generated intense controversy on college campuses.

Anti-Semitism in America

Oct 31, 2018
Governor Tom Wolf / Flickr

A shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue on Saturday left 11 people dead, six wounded and a community shaken by the apparently anti-Semitic motivations of the shooter. 

The incident has revived questions about anti-Semitism in contemporary America, with many saying that non-Jews just don’t know how bad it is.

Today on All Sides, we discuss anti-Semitism in America and how it’s changing.

The Anti-Defamation League has released its annual report of anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. for 2017.

Last year marked the largest single-year increase nationwide since the ADL began tracking incidents in the late ‘70s. Ohio ranked 19th in the nation with 26 anti-Semitic incidents reported last year. In terms of per capita incidents, Ohio ranked in the lower half of states at number 34.

The Anti-Defamation League has identified 1,986 anti-Semitic incidents in its 2017 Audit of Anti-Semitic Incidents. That's up from 1,267 in 2016, marking the highest single-year increase since the organization released its first audit in 1979.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Just a day before Jews celebrate one of their holiest days, Yom Kippur, an Ohio lawmaker is drawing attention to a resolution that condemns a protest movement on college campuses.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Sunday marks the culmination of one discussion among Jews and Muslims in Northeast Ohio -- and the start of another one. The local dialogue predates Charlottesville, the Muslim travel ban and the election of Donald Trump.

A Jewish advocacy organization expects a staggering increase in anti-Semitic incidents by the end of 2017. That projection comes after the Anti-Defamation League counted an 86 percent spike in attacks on Jews and Jewish institutions so far this year, according to a report released Monday.

Jewish Community Center of Columbus

In the last two months, over 100 Jewish centers across the country have received bomb threats, including the Jewish Community Center of Columbus. On Friday, Senator Rob Portman visited with leaders of Ohio's Jewish community to condemn these attacks as un-American and call for a firm response.
 

The Department of Homeland Security is stepping up its support for Jewish institutions across the nation who've received more than 120 bomb threats in the past two months. Jewish Community Centers have been pressing for help as they've been targeted by waves of threatening calls as well as vandalism.

Since January, the calls coming in to JCCs have been both vivid and unnerving. Betzy Lynch, executive director of the JCC in Birmingham, Ala., got three of the threatening calls, all very similar.