anti-discrimination | WOSU Radio

anti-discrimination

A transmasculine person with a natural hairstyle.
Zackary Drucker / The Gender Spectrum Collection

Cincinnati City Council voted Wednesday to make it illegal to discriminate against natural hair and hairstyles associated with race.

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a long-awaited set of cases testing whether the federal law that bars sex discrimination in employment applies to LGBTQ employees.

Specifically, the question is whether employers are free to fire employees because they are gay or transgender.

A customer at Ms. Melanin in Canal Winchester looks at a weave. Ms. Melanin is one of seven black-owned beauty supply stores in the state.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

A city council member in Cincinnati wants to prohibit discrimination against natural hair and natural hairstyles associated with race.

It's a hectic morning at the home of Kathleen O'Donnell and her wife, Casey. Kathleen is getting their 4-year-old foster daughter ready for the park. She got placed with them overnight. Casey is wrangling the four dogs. They've already got their 11-year-old son off to school.

They live on a tree-lined street in Billings, Mont. It's a place they've called home since 2014.

"All of my family lives in Billings, so with a kid we wanted to be near them," Kathleen said.

The Supreme Court may be eager to portray itself as an apolitical institution. But this term, political questions writ large are knocking at the high court door.

The upcoming term will almost surely be a march to the right on almost every issue that is a flashpoint in American society. Among them: abortion, guns, gay rights, the separation of church and state, immigration and presidential power.

The leader of minority Democrats in the Ohio House says when the new human resources handbook came out last month, it was missing the clause that provided job protection for LGBTQ employees. She wanted to know why that clause, which was in previous handbooks, had been removed.

Workplace Discrimination In The U.S.

Oct 4, 2019
Wikimedia Commons

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost in August joined the Trump Administration in arguing that federal civil rights laws do not protect LGBTQ employees against discrimination in the workplace.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act forbids, among other things, discrimination against workers based on sex. What that means, exactly, will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in October. 

Today on All Sides, workplace discrimination protections and Ohio’s role in the cases at hand.

  

Guests

House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) and House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) unveil new cameras installed in a committee room in March.
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

House Democrats are calling on the Speaker to add protections for LGBTQ members and staffers to the chamber’s employee handbook. A recent draft of the guidelines left sexual orientation and gender identity off the list of protected traits.

The city of Westerville is considering passing an ordinance to extend anti-discrimination protections to LGBTQ people.
Reuben Yau / Flickr

Westerville's City Council is working on an ordinance to ban discrimination based on a person's sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression in employment, housing and public accommodations. 

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

Late Friday, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost filed a "friend of the court" brief in a U.S. Supreme Court case, arguing that federal civil rights laws do not provide LBGTQ employees protection against workplace discrimination.

Dave Yost speaks at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Yost was elected as the next Ohio attorney general.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio's attorney general is joining the U.S. Department of Justice in arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court that federal civil rights laws provide no protection against workplace discrimination for LGBTQ employees.

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the Human Rights Campaign dinner at Ohio State University, Saturday, June 1, 2019, in Columbus.
Paul Vernon / AP

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss Joe Biden's campaign stop in Columbus and his appeal with young progressive voters. Nick Evans, WOSU reporter, joins the show.

A conservative Christian organization and a Catholic school have dropped their lawsuit against an Ohio city for its law protecting against LGBTQ discrimination.

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

The federal Department of Health and Human Services is proposing to roll back an Obama-era policy intended to protect transgender people from discrimination in health care.

Jody Davis, testifies at the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of SB11. She shares stories of discrimination as a transgender woman.
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Several people identifying as LGBTQ went before an Ohio Senate committee to tell their stories of discrimination. They want lawmakers to approve the “Ohio Fairness Act,” a bill that would add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes under the state’s anti-discrimination law. 

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