animals

Updated: 3:44 p.m.

When you're the darling of Cincinnati a simple sheet cake just won't do. Fiona the hippo turns three on Friday and she celebrated a day early with a tiered confection combining all her favorite treats.

Snowy Owl
Jongsun Lee / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers at Black Swamp Bird Observatory near Toledo are studying the migration patterns of snowy owls as part of a research effort called “Project SNOWstorm.”

A white lion famously donated to the Cincinnati Zoo by magicians Siegfried & Roy has died. The zoo says the lion named "Prosperity" was "humanely euthanized" Monday.

Birds And Climate Change

Dec 30, 2019
White-throated sparrow
MIKE'S BIRDS / Flickr

Nearly two-thirds of North America’s birds could be at risk of extinction due to climate change.

According to a report from the National Audubon Society, if the global temperature rise by 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit by the year 2100, 389 species of birds around the continent will be at risk for extinction. 

Bird Rescue And Rehabilitation In Ohio

Dec 27, 2019
Dick Daniels / Wikimedia Commons

Naturalist, artist and writer Julie Zickefoose in May 2017 took on the role of savior to a sick and orphaned baby Blue Jay.

In her new memoir, Zickefoose recalls the process of saving and then releasing the Jay, and also how the jay she named Jemima saved her in return. 

Ten Animals Killed In Fire At Ohio Wildlife Park

Nov 29, 2019
Giraffe
Eric Kilby / Flickr

At least 10 animals were killed in a barn fire that erupted at an Ohio wildlife park, officials said.

Cruelty to animals is now a federal crime under a new law signed by President Trump on Monday.

The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act (PACT) is a bipartisan initiative that bans the intentional crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, impalement or other serious harm to "living non-human mammals, birds, reptiles, or amphibians."

The law also bans "animal crush videos," meaning any photograph, motion picture film, video or digital recording or electronic image that depicts animal cruelty.

The Senate has approved a bill to make severe animal cruelty and torture a federal crime. With the House having passed an identical version of the bill last month, the measure now goes to President Trump, who is expected to sign it into law.

Brutus, an Eastern screech owl, shown off at an Audubon event on Oct. 10, 2019.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

New research from the National Audubon Society finds two-thirds of North American birds are at risk of extinction due to climate change.

Biologists were called to the Veterans Affairs building in Lincoln, Nebr., last week to evict an unusual visitor. A 20-pound bobcat somehow found its way into the VA but was quickly caught in a cage and relocated back to the wild. While that's unlikely to happen in Greater Cincinnati, the namesake of Ohio University's mascot is back on the prowl in Southwest Ohio.

When We Love Our Food So Much That It Goes Extinct

Sep 23, 2019

We humans love food to death — literally.

From mammoths to passenger pigeons, we have driven our favorite meals to extinction through overhunting and habitat destruction. And globally, our tendency to overharvest just a narrow range of crops has limited the variety of foods we eat.

Over the past half-century, North America has lost more than a quarter of its entire bird population, or around 3 billion birds.

That's according to a new estimate published in the journal Science by researchers who brought together a variety of information that has been collected on 529 bird species since 1970.

Dr. Amir Khalil and his rescue team reached the King Hussein Bridge between Jordan and Israel at 6 a.m. on April 4. It was the first of three borders Khalil needed to cross that day, and his second attempt to do so in a week. With him were three trucks and the tools and medicine necessary to evacuate 47 animals — including lions, wolves, baboons and ostriches — from a struggling zoo in the city of Rafah, in the Gaza Strip.

The Trump administration is considering removing the Key deer, one of Florida's most iconic and beloved animals, from the endangered species list. Named for their habitat in the Florida Keys, they are tiny versions of white-tailed deer, typically at the shoulder just 2 or 3 feet tall. They're cute, popular with tourists and used to be found on more than a dozen Florida islands. Today, most of them live on a single island, Big Pine Key.

The Cincinnati Zoo says it is progressing methodically as it re-integrates a gorilla that spent the last nearly 30 years in California.

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