Amy Coney Barrett

Rick Hodges (left) and Jim Obergefell (right) shared their story with StoryCorps in Columbus in July 2019.
STORYCORPS / WOSU

The two men whose names are on the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage are united in one cause, urging the Senate to defeat the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the nation’s highest court.

Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) says he will oppose the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Barrett said during hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week that she had made no deal with President Donald Trump regarding the Affordable Care Act.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court at 1 p.m. ET on Oct. 22.

The date was approved in a party-line vote, 12-10, with most Democrats voting by proxy because they did not appear in person due to the coronavirus. Republicans are hoping the Senate will vote to confirm Barrett before the Nov. 3 election, and they have the votes to do so.

After the committee vote on the 22nd, the full Senate will vote on the nomination.

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings on Thursday on President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Barrett, 48, would replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the high court.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, sat for nearly 20 hours of questioning by 22 members of the Senate Judiciary Committee over two days. At the outset of the process, Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham acknowledged that her confirmation by the panel was all but guaranteed.

Democrats are litigating Judge Amy Coney Barrett's record and outlook on voting as the Senate Judiciary Committee wraps up her three days in the spotlight this week.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California said she worried about Barrett's longtime closeness with Justice Antonin Scalia in view of Scalia's antipathy toward the Voting Rights Act, which the Supreme Court partly dismantled in a 2013 ruling.

Updated at 3:23 p.m. ET

Judge Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court would, Democrats fear, imperil the Affordable Care Act, which has twice narrowly survived in the high court.

The ACA, which is also known as Obamacare, is scheduled to be argued once again before the Supreme Court a week after the Nov. 3 election. On Tuesday, during the second day of hearings at the Senate Judiciary Committee, Democrats repeatedly pressed Barrett on whether she'd made assurances to anyone about how she would rule on the ACA.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett acknowledged on Tuesday that she would at least evaluate the case for recusing herself if a dispute involving the outcome of the presidential election reached the high court this year.

Barrett told Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. that she couldn't state anything before the fact about what she might do — but she did concede that there could be a situation in which she might review those protocols and evaluate recusal, then decide.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett speaks after President Donald Trump announced Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington.
Alex Brandon / AP

Hearings are underway to consider Amy Coney Barrett as the next associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Republican leaders in Ohio are urging the U.S. Senate to confirm Barrett despite pushback from Democrats.

Vice President Mike Pence greeting supporters at Savko and Sons.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Vice President Mike Pence visited Columbus on Monday to rally supporters as Election Day nears. Early voting has already begun in Ohio, which is expected to play another a critical role in this year's presidential contest.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Demonstrators supporting and opposing Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett gathered on Capitol Hill Monday as her confirmation hearings began, with health — from the coronavirus, to the Affordable Care Act and abortion — as a major focus.

There will be plenty of firsts on Monday as the Senate Judiciary Committee opens hearings on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It is the first time that a confirmation hearing is taking place amid a pandemic and with two committee members, both Republicans, recently having tested positive for the coronavirus.

It is also the first time that a confirmation hearing is taking place at the same time early voting has begun in many states, and in a presidential election year.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden argues that taking a stance now on whether, as president, he would seek to increase the number of Supreme Court justices would play right into the hands of President Trump.

"[Trump] always wants [you to] take the eye off the ball, change the subject. I'm not going to play his game," Biden told a local Las Vegas news station over the weekend.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett says "the policy decisions and value judgments of government must be made by the political branches," not the courts.

That's from her opening statement she's set to deliver in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee when her Supreme Court confirmation hearing begins Monday.

President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court says she shares the outlook of her mentor, the late Justice Antonin Scalia. But on the issue of the Second Amendment, Amy Coney Barrett seems to have staked out an even more conservative position.

That's got gun control advocates warning that big changes could be on the way if Barrett gets confirmed.

In 2008, the Supreme Court ruled people have a right to keep handguns at home to defend themselves. Since that time, the high court has mostly avoided taking on new gun cases, refusing to hear 10 such lawsuits in June alone.

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