American Graduate | WOSU Radio

American Graduate

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) launched the American Graduate initiative in 2011 to address the nation’s dropout rate. Public media stations across the country forged community connections and innovative partnerships to help improve student outcomes—contributing to a substantial increase in the national high school graduation rate.

American Graduate: Getting to Work begins in 2018 with CPB grants to 19 public media stations to help advance education and career readiness in their communities.

WOSU Public Media was awarded a two-year grant. Moving forward entails collaboration with local organizations, educational institutions and businesses to assess workforce challenges and opportunities, and production of content focused on the essential skills needed for students and workers to succeed in the job markets of today and tomorrow. CPB gave the Ohio grantees a unique assignment. WOSU, CET/Cincinnati and Ideastream/Cleveland are working in partnership to create a state model for addressing the major issues of education and career readiness.

Learn more at WOSU's American Graduate website.

Amazon employees who are filling boxes in warehouses may be the industry's next engineers.

The company announced Thursday that it will spend more than $700 million to train 100,000 employees for higher-skilled jobs over the next six years.

Sinclair Community College in Dayton.
Sinclair Community College / Flickr

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

Ohio's Adult Diploma Program graduated 78 adults who didn't have high school diplomas in 2016.
Ohio Career-Technical and Adult Education

Ohio’s State Board of Education is preparing to vote on a measure that could open the door to more teaching applicants for career and technical education.

Columbus State Community College

Columbus City Council is rolling out a program to help lower-income students afford trade school or college tuition with less debt.

Miguel Tucker gives a speech to graduating Building Futures class.
Rivet / WOSU

Miguel Tucker, 30, grew up in Columbus. As a kid, he says, he spent a lot of time around negative influences.

Danavan McIntosh programs the 3-D printer in a tech lab at Goodwill Columbus.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

During an early shift at FedEx, Danavan McIntosh made his way down a tall ladder. He'd done it a million times before. This time, he felt himself falling.

Tech Tuesday: Closing The Skills Gap in Tech

May 21, 2019
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Max Pixel / Creative Commons

Microsoft plans to train 15,000 people in artificial intelligence, machine learning, data science, cloud and data engineering as part of a movement to close the tech skills gap.

The tech giant is looking ahead to 2022 when as many as 133 million new jobs will have been created from new technologies. The problem is finding enough people to fill those roles.

Coming up on Tech Tuesday, we’ll hear about an apprenticeship program at the Columbus branch of Accenture, a professional-service company and consulting firm. 

That’s today on All Sides with Ann Fisher.

Amanda Wisniewski (right) and friend Caitlin Wingfield, who she met on the job, enjoy a Columbus crew game.
Courtesy of Amanda Wisniewski

Amanda Wisniewski discovered her niche while processing specimens at medical testing company, LabCorp.

“I found what I wanted to do forever, because something just clicked,” she says. “Working on the robotics and fixing the problems, it was the highlight of my day.”

Dashawn Hodge found his first job through the Boys and Girls Club's Summer Work Program.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

Dashawn Hodge is just a normal 14-year-old boy who hates cutting the grass.

“My mom told me when I get home, I gotta cut the grass,” he says. “I looked at her like, ‘No, I can’t cut the grass!”

Jordan Washington switched careers to be an electrician, which he's learning on the job as part of a five-year apprenticeship.
Rivet / WOSU

Driving a semi-truck is a job that gives you plenty of time to think – too much, actually, for Jordan Washington. He says the job paid well, and it was fun in the beginning until the monotony sunk in.

“But then after a while, I’m just like, 'O.K., I’m bored. This is not for me,’” Washington says.

Robots have revolutionized auto manufacturing, making plants safer and products more reliable — and reducing the number of people involved in the process. But walk inside a modern auto plant, and you'll quickly realize that robots have hardly replaced the human touch — at least, not in some areas.

Erica Miller at the Stanley Electric plant in London, Ohio.
LETICIA WIGGINS / WOSU

Like most kids, Erica Miller loved riding the merry-go-round when she was little.  Her mom took her often to the one at the Columbus Zoo. Miller was always more interested in the gears than the ponies, though.

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos made a swing through Ohio Friday to visit students at Butler Tech, a career and technical school in Butler County. In an event similar to a sports signing day, more than 30 students announced post-graduation jobs with local manufacturers.

Olivia Miltner / WOSU

A job training effort hosted by tech giant Google held its first Ohio workshop in Columbus at the main downtown library Monday.

Women In Male Dominated Careers

Mar 11, 2019

Six percent of women today work full-time in a male-dominated occupation in the United States.  

That reflects an improvement, but women still face an uphill battle -- everything from sexual harassment to pay inequity -- in those fields. 

Today on All Sides, how women manage in male-dominated workplaces. 

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