airplanes | WOSU Radio

airplanes

This year Thom Hawkins is missing his fourth family Thanksgiving back home in Minnesota, by choice.

The 82-year-old lives in Glendale, Calif., and hasn't visited his extended family of nieces, nephews and cousins since September 2016. That's when he decided he couldn't fly anymore because of environmental concerns. Ever since, he has missed weddings, birthdays and graduations, and he expects to miss funerals.

Starting Oct. 1, 2020, when the REAL ID law takes effect, if you plan to fly anywhere in the United States, the driver's license you show to security is probably going to need to have a star at the top. Essentially an enhanced driver's license, it will be required at the airport gate, unless you have another accepted form of ID. And officials are worried that one year out, many people don't yet have one.

The Wright Company Factory, located near W. Third St. in Dayton, has been officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Preservationists have lobbied for more than a decade to receive the special site designation.

The factory buildings were built in 1910 and 1911 and served as the first airplane factory in the United States. Inventors Orville and Wilbur Wright produced more than 100 planes at the factory.

This isn't exactly the golden age of airline travel, but it's a pretty good time to fly by a lot of measures. Flying has never been safer. Airfares are historically low when adjusted for inflation. Technology makes it easier to search for fares and book flights while also helping airlines lose fewer bags and improve their on-time performance.

But if there's one thing air travelers still love to complain about, it's the size of economy class seats.

Cramped cabins, knocked knees, aggrieved elbows: all real problems for today's flyers. But the Federal Aviation Administration has said they aren't its problems — announcing Tuesday that it will not regulate airline seat size and legroom.

The decision came in the form of a letter responding to a lawsuit brought by the group Flyers Rights.

Wilmington Air Park, with $3 million in state money, is ready to start making navigation and infrastructure improvements.
Provided photo

Wilmington Air Park, with 12 companies and 1,200 employees, is ready to embark on $3 million worth of improvements in the first quarter of 2018 as it looks to retain its customers, help them expand and position itself for other opportunities.

Almost two months after the Department of Homeland Security instituted a ban on large electronics on U.S.-bound flights from several countries in the Middle East, the agency is considering expanding the prohibition to flights from Europe.

Updated at 8:50 a.m. ET April 17

An annual study of airline quality in the U.S. gave airlines the highest scores in the 26 years the rankings have been published.

You may be wondering: How is that possible?

Flickr

Cleveland officials searching for a plane carrying six people that disappeared over Lake Erie say more than 120 pieces of debris have been recovered, and many are consistent with the type of aircraft that vanished.

11:00 A lot of people will receive shiny new electronics this holiday season. So what happens to the old stuff? A new report shows the world will produce 65 million tons of electronic waste in 2017 alone. This hour we'll talk about what's being done to reduce that number. And we'll learn more about airplane cell phone use-- but don't get ready to chat just yet. Guests