air pollution

chimney releasing smoke
JWVein / Pixabay

This episode originally aired on May 6, 2020.

The Trump administration has continued to weaken air pollution regulations despite warnings that long-term exposure to dirty air relates to higher COVID-19 death rates.

Harvard researchers made the first statistical link between the two last month, just before the administration loosened some clean air regulations and failed to tighten others.

chimney releasing smoke
JWVein / Pixabay

This episode originally aired on May 6, 2020.

The Trump administration has continued to weaken air pollution regulations despite warnings that long-term exposure to dirty air relates to higher COVID-19 death rates.

Harvard researchers made the first statistical link between the two last month, just before the administration loosened some clean air regulations and failed to tighten others.

chimney releasing smoke
JWVein / Pixabay

The Trump administration has continued to weaken air pollution regulations despite warnings that long-term exposure to dirty air relates to higher COVID-19 death rates.

Harvard researchers made the first statistical link between the two last month, just before the administration loosened some clean air regulations and failed to tighten others.

Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has finalized its rollback of a major Obama-era climate policy, weakening auto emissions standards in a move it says will mean cheaper cars for consumers.

"By making newer, safer, and cleaner vehicles more accessible for American families, more lives will be saved and more jobs will be created," U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao said in a statement.

EPA's 'Secret Science' Rule

Feb 28, 2020
Acid mine drainage can cause creeks to turn a dark orange hue.
Curren Sheldon / 100 Days In Appalachia

This show originally ran on Jan. 22, 2020.

The Trump Administration is working on a policy change that would require scientists to disclose all of their raw data, including confidential medical records, before their findings could be considered in shaping regulations.

A Whirlpool plant in Clyde, Ohio.
Whirlpool

Eight Ohio companies rank among the worst 100 industrial facilities in the country emitting toxic fumes in heavily-populated areas, according to a report released Wednesday. Emissions include chromium, nickel and copper, which are considered hazardous for human health by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

EPA's 'Secret Science' Rule

Jan 22, 2020
Acid mine drainage can cause creeks to turn a dark orange hue.
Curren Sheldon / 100 Days In Appalachia

The Trump Administration is working on a policy change that would require scientists to disclose all of their raw data, including confidential medical records, before their findings could be considered in shaping regulations.

Illustration of the R.E. Burger power plant.
David Wilson / Belt Magazine

The R.E. Burger coal-fired power plant’s final day ended, appropriately enough, in a cloud of black smoke and dust. From 1944 to 2011, the plant generated power, fumes and ash in the Ohio River Valley. It was one of dozens of coal and steel plants dotting the banks of the river, which for years has ranked among the nation’s most heavily polluted.

Emphysema is considered a smoker's disease. But it turns out, exposure to air pollution may lead to the same changes in the lung that give rise to emphysema.

Bill Wehrum is stepping down as the Environmental Protection Agency's chief air quality official at the end of the month, amid mounting scrutiny over possible ethics violations.

EPA Administrator Andrew Andrew Wheeler said Wednesday that Wehrum's departure as the head of the agency's Office of Air and Radiation is both voluntary and expected.

Updated June 12

Testing results find the air quality in and around Spring Grove Village and Winton Terrace "meets air quality standards that are protective of human health," according to the Ohio EPA and the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency.

Several members of a powerful science panel for the Environmental Protection Agency expressed doubt at a hearing Thursday about the long-established scientific consensus that air pollution can cause premature death.

The panel was meeting to consider recommendations that would fundamentally change how the agency analyzes the public health dangers posed by air pollution and could lead to weaker regulation of soot.

Pollution, much like wealth, is not distributed equally in the United States.

Scientists and policymakers have long known that black and Hispanic Americans tend to live in neighborhoods with more pollution of all kinds, than white Americans. And because pollution exposure can cause a range of health problems, this inequity could be a driver of unequal health outcomes across the U.S.

Air quality monitoring is ongoing in several neighborhoods where residents complain noxious odors are making people sick.

Carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. are on the rise again after several years of decline, and a booming economy is the cause.

That's according to a report out today from the Rhodium Group, an independent research firm that tracks CO2 emissions in the U.S.

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