agriculture

Lawmakers unveiled the much-anticipated farm bill compromise Monday night, ending the months-long impasse over whether a critical piece of legislation that provides subsidies to farmers and helps needy Americans buy groceries could pass before the lame-duck session concludes at the end of the year.

The Trump administration quietly released the fourth National Climate Assessment on Friday. The report, commissioned by Congress and compiled by over 300 scientists from 13 federal agencies, warns that rising temperatures and more extreme weather patterns will have a devastating impact on the environment in the Midwest.

House and Senate negotiators are reportedly close to finalizing a framework on a farm bill compromise in hopes it will pass both chambers of Congress and be on the president's desk by the end of the year.

According to a spokesperson for Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., House and Senate committee staff worked through the weekend and again on Monday "exchanging offers daily" as last details are being ironed out.

Wikipedia

Chinese buyers can purchase soybeans from U.S. and South American producers for about the same price—even with retaliatory tariffs placed on American beans. So why are U.S. sales lagging behind?

For months, farmers from Mississippi to Minnesota have been waiting for the Environmental Protection Agency to make up its mind about a controversial weedkiller called dicamba.

Climate change is coming like a freight train, or a rising tide. And our food, so dependent on rain and suitable temperatures, sits right in its path.

The plants that nourish us won't disappear entirely. But they may have to move to higher and cooler latitudes, or farther up a mountainside. Some places may find it harder to grow anything at all, because there's not enough water.

Here are five foods, and food-growing places, that will see the impact.

Wheat

This year, Clark County celebrates its bicentennial. But some of the county’s farms are even older than that. In fact, Clark County is home to seven farms that are more than 200 years old.

In this story, we visit one these original homesteads: The Wallace Family Farm in Medway, where Wallace descendants have saved generations of personal family records. And today the meticulous archives offer a unique window into Clark County and American history.

Google Commons

It’s a rare event for a great growing season to stress out a farmer, but that’s exactly what’s happening across much of Ohio. This fall has brought a harvest that’s huge on yields but short on buyers.

The Spring Grove Village indoor farm, 80 Acres Farms, is in the process of expanding tenfold to two locations in Hamilton. Recently, the business gave WVXU an inside look at how it uses computers to seed, grow, light and harvest its produce.

On a farm in Greene County’s agricultural countryside, the shared vision of a pair of retired school teachers is changing back the landscape, by creating a welcome habitat for both agriculture and nature.

Today on County Lines, Producer Renee Wilde takes a horse drawn wagon ride through a Jamestown farm, that lifetime resident Eugene Kavanagh and his wife Dorothy bought for their local community.

The new trade deal with Canada and Mexico has been warmly welcomed by farmers, manufacturers and business groups across the country, but not always for the reasons President Trump anticipated.

While the president has touted improvements and changes as compared to North American Free Trade Agreement, many people are focusing on what didn't change and expressing relief that there's a deal at all.

Flickr.com

The new trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada could change the prices on the next car you drive, the medicine you take, and the milk you drink. That dairy portion was a big sticking point in negotiating with Canada about their complex dairy tariff system, and the changes are drawing praise from Ohio’s dairy industry.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus City Council approved an ordinance allowing the city to buy a 57-acre plot of land known as the "sheep farm" from The Ohio State University on Monday.

Mike Hayes and I are sitting on the patio of Blue Bank Resort, the business he owns on Reelfoot Lake, in Tennessee. The sun is going down. It's beautiful.

What really catches your eye here is the cypress trees. They line the lake, and thousands of them are standing right in the water. Hayes tells me that they are more than 200 years old.

During the early 1800s, wheat production made Ohio one of the leading grain-growing states in the U.S. As prairie land was settled and major wheat growing moved westward, the grain became less important to the state’s agricultural economy. Corn and soybeans became the staple of farming, and now wheat fields are few and far between in the Ohio countryside.

Pages