Affordable Care Act | WOSU Radio

Affordable Care Act

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Republican Sen. Rob Portman said he supports making changes to the Affordable Care Act through the tax bill in the works in Congress.

Health News Florida

If you plan on purchasing your medical insurance for next year from the Affordable Care Act's exchanges, be prepared for some significant changes.  

For people who buy health insurance through the marketplace created by the Affordable Care Act, the 2018 open enrollment period begins in one week. But many consumers are confused about what to expect. No wonder.

Ohio U.S. Sentators Rob Portman, left, and Sherrod Brown.
Ideastream

Ohio’s two senators agree premiums will go up if a bipartisan compromise on the Affordable Care Act doesn’t get through Congress. But Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman don’t agree on whether that compromise should pass.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET

A bipartisan coalition of 24 senators — 12 Republicans and 12 Democrats — has signed on to health care legislation to prop up the individual insurance market and keep premiums down. With the expected support of all Senate Democrats, it could have the votes to pass the chamber. But questions remain over when it might actually get a vote, as well as whether President Trump and House Republicans would bring the bill over the finish line.

Ohio is in a better position to handle President Trump’s decision to end federal cost-sharing reduction payments to insurance companies than some other states, according to officials at the Ohio Department of Insurance.

Updated at 11:40 p.m. ET

The Trump administration said Thursday that it would end the Affordable Care Act's cost-sharing reduction payments designed to help low-income Americans get health care. Not paying the subsidies, health care experts have warned, could send the health insurance exchanges into turmoil.

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday that is intended to provide more options for people shopping for health insurance. The president invoked his power of the pen after repeated Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, have failed.

"The competition will be staggering," Trump said. "Insurance companies will be fighting to get every single person signed up. And you will be, hopefully, negotiating, negotiating, negotiating. And you will get such low prices for such great care."

President Trump is poised to sign an executive order that he says will make it easier for people to join together as a group and buy health insurance from any state.

The president tweeted about his plans on Tuesday morning.

"Since Congress can't get its act together on HealthCare, I will be using the power of the pen to give great HealthCare to many people — FAST," he wrote.

Republicans officially pulled the plug on their last-ditch effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Tuesday.

"We don't have the votes," said Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., after a closed-door meeting of Senate Republicans. "And since we don't have the votes, we've made the decision to postpone the vote." Cassidy, along with Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., put together the proposal they hoped could pass the Senate.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

Republicans are once again waving the white flag on health care.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that he is pulling the Republican health care bill because it does not have the votes.

Rather than endure another embarrassing vote that sees his caucus come up short, the senators agreed in a closed-door meeting to shelve the bill.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana defended their namesake health care bill Monday even as the measure ran into potentially fatal opposition from a third Senate colleague.

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, came out against the bill, joining fellow Republicans Rand Paul of Kentucky and John McCain of Arizona. That leaves the GOP majority at least one vote short of the 50 votes needed to pass the bill over unified Democratic opposition.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Sen. John McCain of Arizona announced Friday he'll vote “no” on the latest Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. He was one of five U.S. Senators targeted in a new ad from a health care consumer organization opposed to the latest Republican health care bill.

For years now, low-income people who visited Ohio’s foodbanks could also get help filling out the paperwork necessary to get health care through the federal Affordable Care Act’s Navigator program. Due to the Trump administration, that won’t be the case anymore.

Sherrod Brown
Nick Castele / ideastream

Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown says he’s very concerned about the latest Republican attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which seems to have cautious support from his fellow Senator from Ohio, Republican Rob Portman. 

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