Affordable Care Act | WOSU Radio

Affordable Care Act

In a span of less than 24 hours this past week, the Trump administration took two seemingly contradictory actions that could have profound effects on the insurance marketplaces set up by the Affordable Care Act.

Health analysts say that at least one of the efforts, coupled with previous changes initiated by the administration, could help transform the insurance market to be much more like it was before the 2010 federal health law took effect — when regulation, coverage and consumer protections varied widely across the United States.

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Steve Dettelbach, the Democratic nominee for attorney general, says on his first day in office he would have Ohio join a lawsuit to protect the Affordable Care Act. Dettelbach says this would be the best way to defend coverage for pre-existing conditions.

Ross D. Franklin / Associated Press

Former U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, who headed the agency implemented the Affordable Care Act in 2010, spent the day in her home state of Ohio.

Phil Long / Associated Press

Candidates in Ohio's U.S. Senate campaign on Saturday argued in a second debate over different positions on taxes, immigration, gun control, climate change, the influence of money on politics and health care.

Ohio Attorney General and Gov.-elect Mike DeWine
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Democrat Richard Cordray has been barraging his Republican opponent in Ohio's governor's race as someone who wants to end health insurance protections for people with pre-existing conditions.

Obamacare — as the Affordable Care Act is commonly known — won't be on the ballot next month. But the fate of the eight-year old health care law could be decided by which party wins control of Congress in November.

"Medicare for All" — the progressive alternative to Obamacare — also stands to gain or lose ground.

And the Trump administration will be looking for a green light to keep making health care changes of its own.

Ensuring that people with pre-existing health conditions can get and keep health insurance is the most popular part of the Affordable Care Act. It has also become a flashpoint in this fall's midterm campaigns across the country.

And not only is the ACA protection, which mostly applies to people who buy their own coverage, at risk. It's also possible that pre-existing condition protections that predate the federal health law could be in play.

Ohio governor candidates Democratic Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine speak to reporters following their third debate at Cleveland State University.
Angelo Merendino / AP

Richard Cordray and Mike DeWine tussled over healthcare, drug sentencing laws and support for local government in their third gubernatorial debate Monday night.

Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the latest gubernatorial debate and how Obamacare has become a key issue in the campaign.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Doctors in Ohio sparred Monday over which candidate in the state's fall governor's race is best for health care.

Consumers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act markets may be pleasantly surprised this fall as average premiums are forecast to rise much less than in recent years.

The price of a 2019 policy sold on the ACA exchanges will increase less than 4 percent, according to an analysis of preliminary filings from insurers in all 50 states by ACASignups.net, a website and blog run by analyst Charles Gaba that tracks ACA enrollment and insurer participation.

And those insurers are expanding their offerings.

Affordable Care Act Revisit

Aug 7, 2018
Chuck Kennedy / Official White House Archives

Columbus is one of four cities suing the Trump Administration for its plans to undermine the Affordable care Act.

The suit is based on the "take care" clause in the U.S. Constitution that details the President's responsibility to, "take care that the laws be faithfully executed."

Critics say the Trump Administation has undercut the ACA by removing funding for naivgators who assist civilians in choosing their health plans, getting rid of the individual mandate, and suspending the risk adjustment program designed to help smooth out bumps for insurance companies.

President Trump has consistently declared that the Affordable Care Act — commonly referred to as Obamacare — is a broken mess, and after several unsuccessful attempts to repeal the national health care law, he has eagerly anticipated that it will "fail" and "implode."

Pablo Martinez / Associated Press

The City of Columbus announced on Thursday it's filing a lawsuit against the Trump Administration for its treatment of the Affordable Care Act.

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