Affordable Care Act | WOSU Radio

Affordable Care Act

It’s open enrollment season for the health insurance marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act. But many people who need to sign up may not know it. The Trump administration has made a number of moves to diminish the law, including cuts to marketing and outreach. That creates obstacles for groups that help people sign up. 

It's the season to roll up your sleeves, gather your documents, and pick a health insurance plan for 2020. For those shopping for their own plans, HealthCare.gov and the other state exchanges are open for enrollment as of November 1.

Rep. Jeff Crossman (D-Parma) presents details on bill to include patient protections in Ohio law.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic state lawmakers want to add the patient protections found in the Affordable Care Act into Ohio law to ensure coverage for pre-existing conditions and other "essential health benefits" no matter what happens to the federal law in court.

A decision in the latest court case to threaten the future of the Affordable Care Act could come as soon as this month. The ruling will come from the panel of judges in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which heard oral arguments in the Texas v. Azar lawsuit.

An estimated 24 million people get their health coverage through programs created under the law, which has faced countless court challenges since it passed.

The fate of the Affordable Care Act is again on the line Tuesday, as a federal appeals court in New Orleans takes up a case in which a lower court judge has already ruled the massive health law unconstitutional.

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

The federal Department of Health and Human Services is proposing to roll back an Obama-era policy intended to protect transgender people from discrimination in health care.

How Well Do Workplace Wellness Programs Work?

Apr 16, 2019

Workplace wellness programs — efforts to get workers to lose weight, eat better, stress less and sleep more — are an $8 billion industry in the U.S.

Most large employers offer some type of wellness program, with growth fueled by incentives in the federal Affordable Care Act.

But no one has been sure they work. Various studies over the years have provided conflicting results, with some showing savings and health improvements while others say the efforts fall short.

As Democratic candidates for president try to walk a political tightrope between the party's progressive wing and its center-left, they are facing increasing pressure to outline the details of their health care overhaul proposals.

On Wednesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who is running in Democratic primaries, reaffirmed his stance on health care by reintroducing a "Medicare-for-all" bill, the idea that fueled his 2016 presidential run.

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), former state Sen. Charleta Tavares, and Columbus Attorney Zach Klein at a press conference about the Affordable Care Act.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) wants a more forceful response from Ohio Republicans regarding the Trump administration's attempts to hobble the Affordable Care Act.

President Trump, bowing to political reality, says he is putting off his thoughts of finding a replacement for the Affordable Care Act until after the 2020 election.

In remarks to reporters Tuesday, Trump said, "I wanted to put it after the election because we don't have the House." But it became clear that he didn't have support for a replacement to Obamacare in the GOP-led Senate, either.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

Editor's note: NPR has decided in this case to spell out a vulgar word that the president used because it meets our standard for use of offensive language: It is "absolutely integral to the meaning and spirit of the story being told."

At his Thursday night rally in Grand Rapids, Mich., President Trump and his supporters were in a celebratory mood.

Ohio’s Republican attorney general is asking a federal court not to strike down the Affordable Care Act as unconstitutional. He’s filed a brief in a lawsuit over the ACA, or Obamacare, after the Trump administration asked for the entire law to be thrown out.

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

President Trump's decision to kick off a renewed battle to dismantle President Barack Obama's health care law stunned lawmakers on Capitol Hill, who will face the reckoning from voters if the administration's efforts to overturn the law succeed this time around.

 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

President Trump’s administration wants the federal courts to do what Congress didn’t – overturn all parts of the Affordable Care Act. Despite those efforts, Gov. Mike DeWine says Ohioans with pre-existing conditions don’t need to worry.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

In a significant shift, the Trump administration says the entirety of the Affordable Care Act should be struck down in the courts. Previously, the administration had pushed to remove the law's protections for people with pre-existing conditions but had not argued in court that the whole law should be struck down.

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