affirmative action

The U.S. Department of Justice is throwing its support behind an anti-affirmative action group that is suing Harvard University over alleged racial discrimination in its admissions policies.

In a document filed in federal court on Thursday, the Justice Department said it is siding with Students for Fair Admissions in its request for a trial, currently scheduled to begin in mid-October.

School may be out, but there has been no lack of news this summer on race and admissions: an announcement from Jeff Sessions, a Harvard lawsuit, changes in the Supreme Court and proposals for selective high schools in New York City. Here's a rundown of the facts in place, and the latest developments.

Who is in school?

Affirmative Action in Higher Education

Aug 8, 2017
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The Trump administration’s Department of Justice has plans to investigate, and possibly sue, colleges and universities that discriminate against white applicants. That’s according to an internal document recently obtained by The New York Times. Although the Justice Department denies the Times’ reporting, it has reopened the debate over affirmative action policies in college admissions. 

In a 4-3 decision, the Supreme Court of the United States has upheld the University of Texas' affirmative action program.

"The race-conscious admissions program in use at the time of petitioner's application is lawful under the Equal Protection Clause," the court held.

11:00 Abigail Fisher's affirmative action lawsuit against the University of Texas Law School has drawn attention to the question of on-campus diversity. The US Supreme Court determined Fisher's case is best decided by a lower court, and this hour we'll examine the Court's (non-) decision. We'll talk about how diversity is measured, and what its value is in an academic setting. Guests