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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Trump administration may curtail asylum applications at the southern border while a legal challenge to the new rule is litigated in court.

A three-judge panel must now decide if it will uphold a decision keeping Kentucky's only abortion clinic open. EMW Women's Surgical Center and the the administration of Gov. Matt Bevin presented oral arguments in the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati Thursday.

The Trump administration continues to separate hundreds of migrant children from their parents despite a federal court ruling that ordered an end to the practice, according to court documents filed in California by the American Civil Liberties Union.

A group of voting rights advocates and felons has filed a lawsuit after Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis approved a law that could make it more difficult for felons to vote.

The New Push To Limit Abortion In The U.S.

May 24, 2019
Google Creative Commons

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has signed into law what's already being considered the toughest anti-abortion legislation in the nation. 

The controversial measure is part of the latest push to test the limits of abortions rights at the state level. The ACLU of Ohio has sued the state for its own so-called “heartbeat bill,” which bans abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.  

Today on All Sides, the movement to limit legal abortions in the U.S.

In this April 11, 2019 file photo, David Niven, a professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati holds a map displaying the wide disparity of Ohio congressional district office locations,
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Attorneys who gained a federal ruling to throw out Ohio's congressional map are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to let procedures move forward to redraw House districts.

The New Push To Limit Abortion In The U.S.

May 21, 2019
Google Creative Commons

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has signed into law what's already being considered the toughest anti-abortion legislation in the nation. 

The controversial measure is part of the latest push to test the limits of abortions rights at the state level. The ACLU of Ohio has sued the state for its own so-called “heartbeat bill,” which bans abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.  

Today on All Sides, the movement to limit legal abortions in the U.S.

The American Civil Liberties Union says it has uncovered new evidence that federal border agents are violating the Constitution when they search travelers' electronic devices.

Ohio Mayor's Courts And Reform

May 2, 2019
Franklin County Courthouse
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

In a new report, the ACLU of Ohio finds Ohio’s mayor's courts lack transparency and are “geared toward making money rather than delivering justice.”

Instead, the report said, mayor’s courts tend to target out-of-towners and disproportionately affect people of color. 

Today on All Sides, the history of mayor’s courts and how they operate today.

A federal judge in California blocked the Trump administration from requiring asylum-seekers to return to Mexico as they await court hearings in the U.S. But the judge delayed implementing his ruling to give the government time to appeal.

A federal court in California has blocked the Trump administration from terminating the Temporary Protected Status program that allows immigrants from four countries to live and work in the United States.

The ruling issued late Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Edward M. Chen Wednesday affects more than 300,000 immigrants enrolled in TPS from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan.

TPS was created by Congress in 1990 to allow people from countries suffering civil conflict or natural disasters to remain in the U.S. temporarily.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The ACLU of Ohio is taking aim at laws against panhandling in dozens of cities across the state, as part of a nationwide effort coordinated with the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty.

New court filings released late Thursday indicate that the Department of Justice and immigration advocates are still far apart in working out a process for reuniting migrant families who were separated under the Trump administration's zero-tolerance immigration policy.

The Trump administration has told a federal judge that it has reunited more than 1,000 parents with their children after the families were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border, but it has lost track of hundreds more parents.

The data, submitted in a court hearing on Tuesday, suggests that, by the government's accounting, it will largely meet a second deadline imposed by the judge to bring eligible immigrant families back together.

In a legal setback for the Trump administration's immigration policies, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that the government may not arbitrarily detain people seeking asylum.

The ruling comes in a case challenging the administration's policy of detaining people even after they have passed a credible fear interview and await a hearing on their asylum claim.

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