abortion

This Feb, 25, 2020 file photo show the Preterm building, the busiest abortion clinic in Ohio, in Cleveland. Officials in Texas and Ohio are taking steps aimed at banning most abortions during this phase of the coronavirus outbreak.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

A federal judge on Thursday denied a request to throw out a temporary restraining order that blocks Ohio from banning surgical abortions during the coronavirus pandemic. The Ohio Attorney General is appealing the ruling.

Attorney General Dave Yost speaks at a press conference in 2018.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Earlier this week, a federal judge temporarily ruled Ohio cannot force abortion clinics to close under the state's order banning elective, non-essential surgeries. Now the state is considering its next move.

A sign is displayed at Planned Parenthood of Utah Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, in Salt Lake City.
Rick Bowmer / Associated Press

A federal judge has temporarily blocked Ohio from banning surgical abortions as part of state restrictions on non-essential procedures during the coronavirus pandemic.

Like all hospitals in Ohio, Riverside Methodist Hopsital in Columbus has been told to cancel all non-essential and non-elective surgeries.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Health director Amy Acton ordered the cancellation of elective surgeries and procedures, with the goal of preserving personal protective equipment like masks, gloves and gowns, and emptying out hospitals for the projected boom in patients.

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
Sam Aberle / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential surgical procedures, prompting criticism from abortion rights groups.

Missouri could soon become the first state in the nation without a clinic providing abortions, but Planned Parenthood officials say the last remaining one there has already all but ceased performing the procedure.

Down Syndrome Abortion Fight In Ohio Takes Legal Twists

Mar 11, 2020
Abortion rights advocates protest the Down Syndrome ban on abortions at the Ohio Statehouse in 2017.
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

A federal court in Cincinnati will hear complex legal arguments for and against Ohio's Down syndrome abortion ban on Wednesday.

Democratic presidential candidates, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and former Vice President Joe Biden, right, participate in a Democratic debate on Feb. 25, 2020 in South Carolina.
Patrick Semansky / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the aftermath of the Super Tuesday primary election results. Democratic strategist Derrick Clay joins the show.

There were fierce clashes at the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday and a fierce critique from Chief Justice John Roberts afterward upon learning about statements made by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer outside while the arguments were taking place inside.

Addressing a crowd of abortion-rights demonstrators, Schumer, D-N.Y., referred to the court's two Trump appointees, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, and said, "You have unleashed the whirlwind and you will pay the price. You won't know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions."

In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, Caitlin Powers sits in the living room of her Brooklyn apartment in New York, and has a telemedicine video conference with physician, Dr. Deborah Mulligan.
Mark Lennihan / AP

The Ohio Senate on Wednesday passed a bill that bans doctors from using telemedicine to prescribe abortion-inducing drugs. 

State Rep. John Becker (R-Union Twp) in the Ohio House.
Ohio House

A conservative Ohio lawmaker is introducing legislation that would automatically ban abortion in the state if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns the landmark “Roe v. Wade” decision.

Abortion rights are on the chopping block Wednesday as the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case nearly identical to one decided just four years ago.

It's the first major abortion case to come before the court since the 2018 retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, making it the first time the majority of justices hearing an abortion case have anti-abortion-rights judicial records.

Ohio Statehouse Legislative Chamber
Bob Hall / Flickr

The entire Ohio House and half the Senate are on the ballot this year – along with all members of Congress and the president.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Just hours before President Trump addressed thousands of anti-abortion rights activists at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., his administration has given its attendees reason to cheer.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

As thousands of anti-abortion rights activists prepared to march in Washington, D.C., on Friday, President Trump was there to rally his base.

"They are coming after me, because I am fighting for you," Trump told the crowd, without directly mentioning the impeachment trial underway in the Senate. "And we are fighting for those who have no voice."

"And we will win," Trump added, "because we know how to win."

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