2020 Election

WOSU has your guide to the 2020 election in Ohio and around the country. Find stories here on the presidential contest, U.S. House races and more from WOSU and NPR.

Read our Ohio voting guide for information on how to vote and what's on your ballot.

Here’s some key spring election dates to keep in mind:

  • Primary election voter registration deadline: Feb. 18, 2020
  • Early voting begins: Feb. 19, 2020
  • Deadline to request absentee ballot: April 25, 2020
  • Deadline to postmark mail-in ballots: April 27, 2020
  • Limited in-person voting: April 28, 2020
  • Deadline for mail-in ballots to be received: May 8, 2020

Dates to know for the fall election:

  • General election voter registration deadline: Oct. 5, 2020
  • Early voting begins: Oct. 6, 2020
  • General election: Nov. 3, 2020

WOSU also wants to hear from Ohioans about what you care about in 2020. Below, tell us what issues you want candidates to talk about during this election.

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Three states are voting Tuesday in the Democratic presidential primary: Arizona, Florida and Illinois. Ohio suspended its primary. Follow NPR's live coverage with updates on the ground, news from the candidates, analysis and results.

So much has changed since the last round of primaries just a week ago. Coronavirus is dominating everything, and elections are on the back burner.

Some states have postponed their primaries over coronavirus concerns, and officials in Ohio, which is one of the four big states that was supposed to vote Tuesday, have suspended in-person voting.

Politics And Coronavirus

Mar 17, 2020
Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose speaks about the need to delay Ohio's primary election on Monday, March 16.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Health Director Dr. Amy Acton ordered polling locations closed late Monday as a health emergency, hours before voting in Ohio’s primary was set to begin.

Acton’s order offered clarity after hours of uncertainty as to whether the primary could continue, after Gov. Mike DeWine urged voting be postponed to stop the spread of coronavirus.

A bowl of stickers for those taking advantage of early voting, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Steubenville, Ohio.
Gene Puskar / Associated Press

Update: Tuesday, March 17, 6:51 a.m.

Gov. Mike DeWine says Ohio’s primary election Tuesday will not take place after all. 

A voter fills out his ballot, taking advantage of early voting, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Steubenville, Ohio.
Gene J. Puskar / Associated Press

As coronavirus-related closures swept across Ohio, early voting thundered on ahead of Tuesday's primary election. Thousands of voters came out around the state to cast ballots in person on the final weekend of early voting.

The coronavirus outbreak has already led Georgia and Louisiana to postpone upcoming primary elections, but leaders in four states — Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio — that vote on Tuesday say they will continue as planned.

While much of the country has come to a standstill because of the rapidly spreading coronavirus, democracy, it seems, goes on.

Four states are set to hold their presidential primaries on Tuesday, and many more states and territories are currently scheduled to vote before the end of April.

Here are answers to three questions you may have about voting in the time of a pandemic.

1. Are elections still happening?

Just before the Democratic debate Sunday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put out guidelines encouraging Americans not to gather in groups of 50 or more for the next eight weeks.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the 11th Democratic presidential debate, on Sunday, is set to look and sound quite different from the previous 10.

To prevent further transmission of the virus, the Democratic National Committee announced Thursday it will hold the debate in Washington, D.C., with no live audience, instead of its original planned location of Arizona, one of four states voting on Tuesday.

Rep. Joyce Beatty and Congressional candidate Morgan Harper.
Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the big races voters will decide in Tuesday's election. WOSU News reporter Nick Evans joins the show.

Updated at 1:43 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is planning to stay in the 2020 Democratic presidential race despite another disappointing primary night.

Two weeks ago, Sanders was the unlikely front-runner for the nomination. Now former Vice President Joe Biden has consolidated support so rapidly, and won so many states, that Sanders is facing calls to drop out of the race.

But Sanders announced his intention to press on in a statement on Wednesday.

Columbus State President David Harrison in the school's transfer center.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus State Community College has a growing slate of deferred maintenance required for old buildings, and a wishlist of new facilities to build. For the first time, the school is asking voters to borrow money to help pay for capital needs around campus.

Updated at 11:24 a.m. ET

It was another big night for Joe Biden.

The former vice president won a set of resounding victories over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Tuesday, most notably in Michigan, which Sanders won four years ago.

Barring something catastrophic for Biden, the results now put him on a path to being the Democratic nominee and the candidate to take on President Trump in the fall.

Joe Biden at a campaign stop in Columbus, Ohio, on March 10, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Activists from Moms Demand Action and the Brady Campaign fanned out behind the podium in a small Driving Park gymnasium. Wearing red or purple shirts, many held signs declaring “beat the NRA with Biden."

Updated: 7:15 p.m., Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Both Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden canceled Tuesday campaign events in Cleveland out of an abundance of coronavirus caution.

The abrupt cancellations from the Democratic presidential hopefuls came after Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine advised avoiding large public events as a health precaution.

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