2020 Election

WOSU has your guide to the 2020 election in Ohio and around the country. Find stories here on the presidential contest, U.S. House races and more from WOSU and NPR.

Read our Ohio voting guide for information on how to vote and what's on your ballot.

Here’s some key spring election dates to keep in mind:

  • Primary election voter registration deadline: Feb. 18, 2020
  • Early voting begins: Feb. 19, 2020
  • Deadline to request absentee ballot: April 25, 2020
  • Deadline to postmark mail-in ballots: April 27, 2020
  • Limited in-person voting: April 28, 2020
  • Deadline for mail-in ballots to be received: May 8, 2020

Dates to know for the fall election:

  • General election voter registration deadline: Oct. 5, 2020
  • Early voting begins: Oct. 6, 2020
  • General election: Nov. 3, 2020

WOSU also wants to hear from Ohioans about what you care about in 2020. Below, tell us what issues you want candidates to talk about during this election.

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Ohio's election is upon us: Voting for the primary ends Tuesday, April 28.

Jim O'Bryan drops of his election ballot in the drop box at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohio's virus-extended 2020 primary is finally coming to end, nearly 10 weeks after voting began. State officials postponed in-person voting scheduled March 17 due to safety amid the pandemic, and they wound up with a mostly vote-by-mail plan that will allow in-person voting Tuesday for some people with special circumstances.

Jim O'Bryan drops of his election ballot in the drop box at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Ohioans who requested but haven't yet received their absentee ballot by Tuesday's election will be allowed to cast a provisional ballot at their county board of elections.

Ohio I Voted Sticker
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Voter participation in Ohio's pandemic-delayed primary election is on a slow pace with less than one week to go.

More than a quarter of the country's 18- to 29-year-olds say that their lives are worse because of President Trump, according to a new poll, the latest to show the motivating impact the president could have on the youngest subset of voters this election year.

The poll, by Harvard's Institute of Politics, found that 29% of that cohort say their lives are worse under President Trump's leadership, 39% say their lives are no different, and 15% say their lives are better.

Editor's note: This story contains a graphic description of an alleged sexual assault.

Tara Reade, a former junior staffer in Joe Biden's Senate office, has accused the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her in 1993, when she was working as a staff assistant. The Biden campaign denies the accusation and says the alleged incident "absolutely did not happen."

A voter fills out his ballot, taking advantage of early voting, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Steubenville, Ohio.
Gene J. Puskar / Associated Press

Voting rights group All Voting Is Local says 1.5 million Ohioans have requested absentee ballots so far this year – about half the number who voted in the last presidential primary four years ago.

Election-year legal battles over voting procedures are nothing new. But their scope and intensity are growing this year amid deep partisan polarization and the logistical challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic. The legal fights are expected to heat up in the coming weeks.

Elizabeth Warren has now fully thrown her support behind former Vice President Joe Biden in the presidential race. She has even said, without question, that she would serve as his vice president.

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose marks National Registration Day at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019.
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the calls to re-open the state economy and the looming absentee ballot deadline. Ohio Secretery of State Frank LaRose joins the show.

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren formally backed former Vice President Joe Biden for president on Wednesday, over a month after she ended her own campaign, extending a string of big endorsements as party leaders rally around the presumptive Democratic nominee.

"In this moment of crisis, it's more important than ever that the next president restores Americans' faith in good, effective government — and I've seen Joe Biden help our nation rebuild," Warren said in a tweet.

Updated at 12:02 p.m. ET

Former President Barack Obama officially endorsed his former vice president, Joe Biden, on Tuesday, marking the Democratic establishment's formal consolidation around the party's presumptive presidential nominee.

Updated at 4:27 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders officially endorsed his former rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, on Monday.

Sanders, who suspended his campaign last week, had long said he'd support whoever won the Democratic nomination, but he did not formally endorse Biden when he announced an end to his own run on Wednesday.

Sanders made the announcement as he remotely joined Biden on a livestream video.

Who does and doesn't get to vote in November could rest on how states, political parties and the federal government respond to the coronavirus threat to U.S. elections.

A day after Bernie Sanders dropped out of the presidential race, Joe Biden, now the presumptive Democratic nominee, made an overture to progressives.

On Thursday he rolled out two new policy proposals:

  1. Lower the age of Medicare eligibility from 65 to 60.
  2. Forgive student debt for low-income and middle-class families who attended public colleges and universities and some private institutions.

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