2020 Election

WOSU has your guide to the 2020 election in Ohio and around the country. Find stories here on the presidential contest, U.S. House races and more from WOSU and NPR.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman will oppose an effort by some of his Republican colleagues to throw out President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral votes when Congress formalizes the presidential election results this week.

Portman announced his decision in a statement Monday, saying he “cannot support allowing Congress to thwart the will of the voters” by overturning Biden’s win.

Depending on whom is asked, President Trump's Saturday phone call to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger — during which he urged state officials to "find" votes that could overturn his loss in the state during November's election — may have violated state and federal law.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET Tuesday

The political world has trained its focus on Georgia's two U.S. Senate races, which will settle the kind of Senate that President-elect Joe Biden will be dealing with.

The races, taking place Tuesday — the day before Biden is slated to be certified by Congress as the winner of the 2020 presidential election — are expected to be close. Consider that Biden won the rapidly changing but previously traditionally Republican state by fewer than 12,000 votes.

A battle is looming between congressional Republicans who plan to object to the certification of November's presidential election results, and others who believe Congress needs to accept the will of the voters.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

An angry President Trump pushed Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican, to overturn the state's presidential election result and appeared to at least partly blame Raffensperger for what could be lower turnout in Tuesday's runoff elections, which will decide control of the U.S. Senate, according to a recording of a phone call obtained by Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

A group of Republicans has announced plans to reject presidential electors from states they consider disputed if Congress doesn't create a commission to investigate their claims of fraud. The effort, fueled by baseless allegations of voter fraud, drew support from Vice President Pence by Saturday night.

A man who idenitfied himself as "Bill from Clintonville" expressed his support for Dr. Amy Acton at the Statehouse.
David Holm / wosu

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the tumultuous year that was 2020. From COVID-19 to the election to a $60 million bribery scandal to the protests over the killing of George Floyd, this has certainly been a year we will never forget.

A significant number of Americans believe misinformation about the origins of the coronavirus and the recent presidential election, as well as conspiracy theories like QAnon, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

President Donald Trump speaking to supporters in Circleville.
Nick Evans / WOSU

A year ago, 2020 looked like it was going to be another busy election year in Ohio. But with the pandemic crowding out most other news and keeping candidates off the campaign trail, the election season took several unexpected turns.

Democrats are trying to figure out what the voters were trying to tell them this year, because it was kind of confusing.

President-elect Joe Biden won the popular vote by 4.5 percentage points — a 7 million vote margin — and got 306 electoral votes, which President Trump once called "a massive landslide victory" when he got the same number in 2016.

But Biden had no coattails.

Republican Kyle Stone will be the first-ever Black elected prosecutor in Stark County, and the only one currently serving in Ohio.
Kyle Stone

In January, Stark County will have its first-ever Black elected prosecutor. Republican Kyle Stone, 37, will also be the only Black county prosecutor in the state of Ohio.

Updated Tuesday at 11:33 p.m. ET

As President Trump continues to claim falsely that he, and not Joe Biden, won the Nov. 3 presidential election, Congress will meet in a joint session Wednesday to formally count the votes of the Electoral College.

The states have already counted their own electors, and Biden won with 306 to 232 for Trump. Now it's up to Congress to tally the votes as submitted by the states.

Here's a look at how the process is expected to play out:

1. A joint session, presided over by the vice president

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio)
John Minchillo / Associated Press

During a press call Tuesday, Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) explained why he waited more than a month to acknowledge President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, and detailed a COVID-19 relief package he helped draft. 

Updated at 1:19 p.m. ET

A day after the Electoral College made the results official, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell congratulated President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris for their victory.

McConnell joins a wave of new Republicans acknowledging the win on Monday.

Signs and flags at the pro-Trump rally at the Ohio Statehouse on Saturday, November 7, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Ohio's 18 electors were pledged to Donald Trump on Monday in a process prescribed by law and with lots of formality, but little suspense. At the same time, a majority of Electoral College voters across the country cemented the victory of President-elect Joe Biden.

Pages