2020 Election

WOSU has your guide to the 2020 election in Ohio and around the country. Find stories here on the presidential contest, U.S. House races and more from WOSU and NPR.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, prepares to evacuate the floor as protesters try to break into the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Members of Ohio’s congressional delegation are scattered across the U.S. Capitol campus as pro-Trump extremists storm the Capitol building and surrounding offices, including the House and Senate chambers.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden called the violent protests that engulfed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday an "assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people's business" and called on President Trump to immediately demand that his supporters stop the violence.

In a somber address, Biden called on Trump, who had not publicly spoken since a rally earlier Wednesday, to "go on national television now to fulfill his oath and defend the Constitution and demand an end to this siege."

As pro-Trump extremists clash with police and breach the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser has ordered a citywide curfew starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

"During the hours of the curfew, no person, other than persons designated by the Mayor, shall walk, bike, run, loiter, stand, or motor by car or other mode of transport upon any street, alley, park, or other public place within the District," her statement reads.

The curfew will last until 6 a.m. on Thursday.

It does not apply to essential workers, including media with outlet-issued credentials.

Post-election audits found vanishingly few errors in November’s vote counts across Ohio, according to data released by Secretary of State Frank LaRose on Tuesday.

Since November, county election staff have recounted ballots by hand in a selection of precincts, focusing on three races: the presidential race, one Ohio Supreme Court race and a countywide race.

In the presidential contest, the audits matched official results by 99.98 percent on average.

Updated 3:08 p.m. ET

Thousands of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, prompting the House and Senate to abruptly take a recess as the U.S. Capitol Police locked down the building. D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered a citywide curfew from 6 p.m. on Wednesday until 6 a.m. on Thursday.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Democrat Jon Ossoff has defeated Republican David Perdue in the Georgia runoff, The Associated Press said Wednesday, giving Democrats control of the U.S. Senate.

"It is with humility that I thank the people of Georgia for electing me to serve you in the United States Senate," Ossoff said earlier Wednesday.

Perdue, whose Senate term expired earlier this week, has not conceded the race.

Democrat Raphael Warnock made history in one of Georgia's two Senate runoffs on Tuesday when he became the first Black person to be elected to the Senate from the state and the first Black Democratic senator from the South.

"Georgia certainly made me proud last night," Warnock told NPR's Noel King Wednesday morning. "They decided to send a kid who grew up in public housing to the United States Senate to represent the concerns of ordinary people."

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi informed House lawmakers that Congress will reconvene Wednesday night to continue its constitutional duty to count and certify the electoral votes after pro-Trump protestors breached the Capitol and forced Capitol Police to evacuate both the House and Senate.

Electoral College Results Certification

Jan 6, 2021
Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan
Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post via AP, Pool

Thirteen Republican senators and more than 100 House members say they’ll object to certifying Electoral College results today for president-elect Joe Biden.

The certification process is normally a routine, ceremonial affair in Congress but not this year.

Updated at 4:36 p.m. ET

Democrats took exceedingly narrow control of the Senate on Wednesday after winning both runoff elections in Georgia, granting them control of Congress and the White House for the first time since 2011.

Updated at 2:05 a.m. ET

Democrat Raphael Warnock has edged out Georgia Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler in a closely watched runoff election.

"Tonight, we proved that with hope, hard work and the people by our side, anything is possible," he told supporters in a virtual speech.

The Associated Press has also called the race for Warnock, who appeared to have beaten his opponent by just a few tens of thousands of votes.

Updated at 2:06 a.m. ET Wednesday

Democrats are hopeful about possibly taking total control of Washington after the Associated Press projected that the party had picked up one of two Georgia Senate seats early Wednesday morning.

The Senate runoff elections in Georgia on Tuesday were set to decide which party will hold the majority in the upper chamber, with Democrats already winning the presidency and holding a slim House majority.

Georgia U.S. Senate Runoff Elections

Jan 5, 2021
Democratic U.S. Senate challenger the Rev. Raphael Warnock speaks during a rally in Columbus, Ga. with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and fellow Democratic U.S. Senate challenger Jon Ossoff.
Ben Gray / Associated Perss

Tuesday is the final day of voting in two very tight runoff elections in Georgia that will determine control of the U.S. Senate. Democrats Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock are challenging incumbent Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler.

Republicans and Democrats all the way up the food chain make a final push to turn out the votes. The outcome of the races will have huge ramifications for the incoming Biden Administration’s ability to pursue its policy goals.

Ohio’s Gov. Mike DeWine and Sen. Rob Portman both say they oppose the effort by a contingent of Republicans to object to certification of the electoral college results on Wednesday, as part of an unprecedented and ill-fated attempt to overturn the results of the presidential election.

Updated at 11:38 a.m. ET

In his ongoing quest to overturn the November election, President Trump has demanded total loyalty of his fellow Republicans around the country, but nowhere more dramatically than Georgia — where the last thing Republicans needed was an intraparty fight heading into its competitive U.S. Senate runoffs on Tuesday.

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