2020 Election

WOSU has your guide to the 2020 election in Ohio and around the country. Find stories here on the presidential contest, U.S. House races and more from WOSU and NPR.

After a lifetime of membership in exclusive clubs, President Trump is about to join one against his will.

It is the club of one-term presidents.

There is surely no dishonor in serving a single term in the nation's highest office. Trump will bring to 23 the number of presidents who had the job for just four years or fewer, so the club includes about half of all those who have taken the oath. Five presidents died while in their first term (two by assassination). Several who stepped in for one of these fallen presidents completed the remainder of that term and left.

Pro-Trump and anti-government demonstrators at the Ohio Statehouse on Jan. 17, 2021.
Clare Roth / WOSU

With snow falling lightly on Columbus, and the windows of the Ohio Statehouse boarded up and guarded by scores of Ohio National Guard members, a small but ideologically diverse crowd gathered in Capitol Square downtown Sunday.

Updated at 7:13 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors" — specifically, for inciting an insurrection against the federal government at the U.S. Capitol.

Just one week before he will leave office, Trump has now become the first U.S. president to be impeached twice.

Wednesday's vote came a week after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic scene that left five people dead.

Voters waiting more than two hours to cast a ballot during the final weekend of early voting in Ohio on Sunday, November 1 at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Antone White, the new director of the Franklin County Board of Elections, says he's ready to evaluate the voting process and enhance voter education after the tumultuous 2020 election. 

Sen. Rob Portman said Tuesday that President Donald Trump bears “some responsibility” for the riot at the U.S. Capitol last week, calling on the president to discourage violence in the days before President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration.

“Both in his words before the attack on the Capitol and in his actions afterward, President Trump bears some responsibility for what happened on January 6,” Portman said in a statement released by his office Tuesday.

With just eight days until President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, law enforcement and local government officials in Washington, D.C., are implementing security measures that will make the historic transition of power look very different from those in the past.

The New York State Bar Association is considering expelling Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani as a member because of his comments ahead of the Wednesday attack on the U.S. Capitol, and his efforts for months to cast doubt on the results on the presidential election.

The bar association said it received "hundreds of complaints in recent months" about Giuliani, ultimately deciding Monday to launch a "historic" inquiry.

Autocracy And President Trump

Jan 11, 2021
President Donald Trump speaking to supporters in Circleville.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Continuing his unfounded claim that the 2020 election was stolen, outgoing President Donald Trump on Wednesday incited a violent mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

A New York University history professor who studies autocratic rulers says the insurrection attempt and the fervent allegiance displayed by Trump’s followers are straight out of the authoritarian playbook.

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

With nine days left before President Trump's term comes to an end, the House of Representatives is forging ahead with plans to try to remove the president from office over his role in his supporters' violent attack last week on the U.S. Capitol.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

When President-elect Joe Biden is sworn into office on Jan. 20, a traditional element that once illustrated a peaceful transfer of power between presidential administrations will be missing: the outgoing president.

In a tweet Friday morning, President Trump said, "To all of those who have asked, I will not be going to the Inauguration on January 20th."

Updated at 12:50 a.m. ET on Friday

More than 24 hours after thousands of his supporters stormed the Capitol, President Trump on Thursday night condemned the violence in a video he posted on social media, calling it a "heinous attack."

The video, which comes more than two months after the election that he fought to find a way to reverse, marks the first time Trump acknowledges that he lost — coming as close as he likely will get to a concession.

Heading into Wednesday's joint session of Congress to tally the Electoral College vote results, lawmakers anticipated a long day peppered with objections hinged on baseless allegations of election fraud. More than a dozen Republican senators had said they would object to at least one state's election results.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) specifically called out President Donald Trump for inciting the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, marking the first time DeWine has publicly criticized Trump for refusing a peaceful transition of power.

Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, speaks to the audience during the Ohio Democratic Party election night watch party, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Rep. Joyce Beatty (D-Columbus) is joining the list of officials calling for President Trump’s immediate removal from office after extremist pro-Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building Wednesday.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, prepares to evacuate the floor as protesters try to break into the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how Ohio politicians are responding to the violent breach of the U.S. Capitol building by pro-Trump extremists. Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau chief Karen Kasler joins the show.

Pages