2020 census

A group of House Democrats introduced a bill Wednesday that would push back major deadlines for the 2020 census as requested by the U.S. Census Bureau because of the coronavirus pandemic.

A Census 2020 form is seen Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020, in Toksook Bay, Alaska.
Gregory Bull / Associated Press

April 1 is Census Day - which is not so much a deadline but a check-in. If someone fills out their 2020 Census form after this date, they respond with where they were living on April 1.

Updated at 9:59 p.m. ET

While tens of millions of U.S. households continue to fill out 2020 census forms on their own, the coronavirus pandemic is forcing the Census Bureau to suspend field operations for the once-a-decade head count for two more weeks until April 15.

Updated on March 6 at 10:10 a.m. ET

Making sense of the census can be difficult.

In the U.S., the national head count comes around once every 10 years. That's enough time for memories to fade and for newcomers to settle into life here without ever encountering the constitutional mandate, which determines how political representation and federal tax dollars are distributed.

After centuries of putting pen or pencil to paper, the U.S. government is getting ready to rely on digital screens and the cloud for its first-ever primarily online census.

Starting March 12, households across the country are expected to be able to participate in the once-a-decade national head count by going to my2020census.gov to complete the online census questionnaire, which is set to be open to the public through July 31.

The federal government estimates nearly 1 million children under the age of 5 went uncounted in the 2010 U.S. Census.

Houleye Thiam, a Mauritanian immigrant, is working to educate Columbus' African community about the 2020 Census.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Efforts are underway in Ohio for the 2020 Census, the U.S. government's once-a-decade effort to count every resident in the country. Mailers will begin showing up on doorsteps as early as next month, with a national Census Day planned for April 1.

Updated on Feb. 12 at 6:42 p.m. ET

In these final weeks before the 2020 census is rolled out to the entire U.S., the federal government is under pressure to hire and train around a half-million door knockers and other temporary workers by this spring.

As work begins on the 2020 U.S. Census, Ohio officials are looking for ways to count populations that are historically difficult to reach, said U.S. Census Bureau officials at a town hall in Elyria on Friday.

The census aims to document every person living in the country and collect information including race, gender and age. But officials have difficulty collecting that information with certain groups, including young children, immigrants and the homeless.

The 2020 census count begins in Ohio in April and grassroots organizations are teaming up to ensure this one will be as accurate as possible.

Five Ohio nonprofits - including the Ohio Children’s Defense Fund – will share a $250,000 grant to distribute to organizations promoting census participation.

A Census 2020 form is seen Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020, in Toksook Bay, Alaska.
Gregory Bull / Associated Press

As Michelle Heritage walks through the corridors of the YWCA Family Shelter in Columbus, she shares her ultimate vision for Franklin County.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jan 6, 2020
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio is growing, but population data suggests the state is not growing fast enough to prevent losing one of its 16 Congressional seats after the 2020 census.

This would be Ohio’s sixth consecutive loss of Congressional seats.

Neighboring Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Michigan are also on pace to lose seats in the Census count.

More than a year after his death, a cache of computer files saved on the hard drives of Thomas Hofeller, a prominent Republican redistricting strategist, is becoming public.

Republican state lawmakers in North Carolina fought in court to keep copies of these maps, spreadsheets and other documents from entering the public record. But some files have already come to light in recent months through court filings and news reports.

Northeast Ohio communities hope no one goes uncounted in the 2020 Census.

Complete count committees, local groups made up of area government and community leaders, will spend the next few months promoting the decennial count.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Facebook is changing user policies for its social media platforms to explicitly ban disinformation about and ads trying to discourage participation in the 2020 census, the company announced on its website Thursday.

The company says it plans to enforce these specific bans on all users, including politicians — a departure from previous comments from Facebook officials who said the company did not want to restrict politicians' speech on its platforms.

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