2019 election | WOSU Radio

2019 election

Voters in four states head to the polls on Tuesday for general statewide elections of note. These off-year contests may not be as high profile as the 2020 presidential and congressional elections will be a year from now, but they could offer some important hints on how voters are feeling about President Trump, impeachment, guns and more.

Columbus City Councilmember Elizabeth Brown (left) speaks out about proposed cuts to refugee admissions as Columbus City Councilmember Rob Dorans (right) looks on.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Columbus City Council member Rob Dorans says Tuesday's election is about growth.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Monday is the last day for early voting before Tuesday's election. 

Joe Motil, Liliana Rivera Baiman (holding signs) with Yes We Can canvassers.
Nick Evans / WOSU

On a drizzly Sunday afternoon, Joe Motil went knocking on doors in a neighborhood near MAPFRE Stadium.

A Columbus Council candidate forum in October 2019. From left: Elizabeth Brown, Rob Dorans, Shayla Favor, Joe Motil, moderator Walker Evans, Emmanuel Remy, Scott Singratsomboune and Tiffany White.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Next Tuesday is Election Day, and four Columbus City Council seats are on the ballot. Four incumbent council members are running for re-election, challenged by three candidates backed by the progressive organization Yes We Can.

And then there's Scott Singratsomboune, who is pitching himself as an independent voice on Council and completely self-funding his campaign.

Voters fill out their ballots at the Hamilton County Board of Elections on the first day of early voting, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss why it's so hard to get voters out to polls for local elections where their impact can be much greater. Political consulatant Mary Anne Sharkey joins the show.

Columbus City Schools District Office.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Local education groups are hosting a forum of Columbus school board candidates at Columbus Downtown High School on Tuesday night. The six people running for a spot on the Columbus City School Board will be on hand.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio's next election is scheduled for November 5, 2019. If you want to vote, you need to make sure your name is still on the voter rolls before Monday's registration deadline.

Voters fill out their ballots at the Hamilton County Board of Elections on the first day of early voting, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Secretary of State Frank LaRose says 182,858 voter registrations were removed from the rolls in Ohio’s latest voter purge.

COTA

For the first time, the Central Ohio Transit Authority will offer free bus fares for all customers on Election Day.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Voters at the Whetstone Recreation Center were waiting in line for nearly an hour Tuesday morning while poll workers wrangled with new voting machines.

Secretary LaRose (right) showing a resident the new machine at National Church Residences in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Franklin County will use new voting machines for Tuesday’s primary election, setting up a kind of dress rehearsal for the 2020 presidential election.

Ohio I Voted Stickers
John Minchillo / Associated Press

With the May primary set for Tuesday, some Ohioans might be thinking about switching political parties to cast a ballot for a friend who is running for office or have a say in more interesting, contested races. However before doing that, voters need to think about the possible repercussions.

The early voting center at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Off-year elections don't often get a lot of attention from voters. Even less notice is paid to primary elections in an off-year. But Ohio voters will decide on many significant issues on May 7, in addition to selecting the candidates that will campaign through November.

Mayor Ginther describing the city's One Linden Plan during an interview with Tracy Townsend of WBNS-TV at the Columbus Metropolitan Club.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus officials are asking voters to sign off on $50 million in new borrowing for affordable housing. But voters will have to decide before a specific spending plan is in place.

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