StoryCorps COLUMBUS | WOSU Radio

StoryCorps COLUMBUS

Thursdays on All Things Considered and Saturdays on Weekend Edition

StoryCorps COLUMBUS brings you interviews from Central Ohioans discussing some of the most important moments of their lives.

StoryCorps’ mission is to preserve and share humanity’s stories in order to build connections between people and create a more just and compassionate world. In the summer of 2019, StoryCorps partnered with WOSU Public Media to record dozens of stories in Columbus.

Now, StoryCorps COLUMBUS delivers a collection of those stories through a podcast and 89.7 NPR News.  

Rick Hodges and Jim Obergefell
storycorps / WOSU

The landmark 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision on "Obergefell v. Hodges" legalized same-sex marriage. In the case, Cincinnati real estate broker Jim Obergefell sued the state of Ohio for refusing to recognize his marriage to his husband John Arthur on Arthur’s death certificate after he died from ALS.

Yolanda Zepeda and Elena Foulis
storycorps / wosu

Friends and colleagues Elena Foulis and Yolanda Zepeda find joy in sharing traditional Latin American recipes with others. In this conversation for StoryCorps COLUMBUS, they talk about their favorite foods, and how they’ve introduced their spouses to different dishes, including lesser known delicacies like "menudo," a Mexican tripe soup.

Ernie Hartong and his daughter Erin Sogal.
StoryCorps COLUMBUS / WOSU

Ernie Hartong enlisted in the army during the Vietnam War. Today, he volunteers at Columbus’s National Veteran’s Memorial and Museum.

Ernie sat down with his daughter Erin Sogal to reflect on his service, how soldiers stayed in touch with loved ones at home, and how he works to communicate his experience to young people.

Holly and Spencer Gross smiling with StoryCorps COLUMBUS logo
storycorps / WOSU

Holly Gross grew up across the pond in England. Her husband Spencer has lived in Ohio his whole life. When it comes to politics, Holly is liberal and Spencer is conservative. Even still, this couple managed to fall in love, and they agree their differences bring them closer together.

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee
storycorps

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee had their hearts broken when crews demolished one of Columbus’s most famous landmarks. But the loss of the historic building also started their lives together.

Jonathon W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathon W. Tolbert IV
storycorps

John W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathan W. Tolbert IV, remember the legacy of Marshall "Major" Taylor, a professional African American cyclist who stormed the cycling scene and broke racial barriers in the late 1800s.

Major Taylor became the inspiration for a Columbus-based bicycle club that’s now 40 years old. John III told his son they didn’t know much about cycling when they started, and none of them had heard of the man who would be the club’s namesake.   

photo of  John and Jane Byrnes
storycorp

Katie Byrnes was born deaf, but this didn’t stop her from finding ways to relate to others.

Her parents, Jayne and John Byrnes remember Katie’s earliest signs of communicating, her intelligence and love of music. Even though Katie passed at the young age of five-years-old, she had an incredible impact on the deaf community.

WOSU

StoryCorps COLUMBUS is the new podcast and radio series from WOSU Public Media.