Classical 101 by Request

Do you have a piece of music you’d love to hear on Classical 101 — either for yourself or to share with someone else?

While Classical 101 By Request is on hiatus, we’d still like to hear from you about the music you’d like us to play. We’ll work as many selections as we can into our regular programming and let you know when to listen for them.

Request something from your favorite artist or composer, or a piece that has special associations for you. Just fill out the form below, and please tell us why you want to hear the music so we can share your story with our listeners. We may not be able to play every request, but we’ll accommodate as many as possible.

What do you want to hear on Classical 101?

Can you play the ocarina?

I'm supposed to know about these things, but I admit I had to go online and find out more about the ocarina.

Why? Well, I can't play the ocarina.

But Sean Flynn can play the ocarina, and it all began with his love of Nintendo video-game series The Legend of Zelda.

Here, Sean plays his three ocarinas of varying sizes, shapes and sounds in the Classical 101 music library:

Recently I was reminded that Mozart wrote his final opera, Die Zauberflöte "The Magic Flute," as entertainment for a suburban theater outside Vienna. He expected the audience to be engaged, energetic and joyful. After all, those elements are clear in Mozart's music, and Emanuel Schikaneder's Theater auf der Wieden included a tavern and a casino. Between wine, billiards and Mozart, a good time was had by all.

No wine and no billiards, but Opera Columbus did a smashing job last week with an abridged Magic Flute adapted for kids.

color photo of Mohammed Fairouz in front of ivy
Samantha West / mohammedfairouz.com

My taste in music is probably the only area of my life that can be described as "conservative"—I tend to be a questioner, muckraker and troublemaker. But when it comes to music, I think we can't study or listen to Mozart and Beethoven enough.

Sadly, this predisposition means I can sometimes be dismissive of young artists working today.

Don't be like me. Take a few minutes to meet Arab-American composer Mohammed Fairouz and listen to his oratorio Zabur.

Celebrate Black History Month with Classical 101

Feb 10, 2017
Wynton Marsalis playing trumpet
Eric Delmar / Wikimedia Commons

Black History Month is a time to recognize and celebrate the contributions of African-Americans, and in classical music that contribution is profound. Throughout the month of February, Classical 101 will be highlighting some of those legacies.

photo of ticket stub from 1973 Washington Cathedral concert, conducted by Leonard Bernstein
Leonard Bernstein Facebook page

Richard Nixon's second inauguration, on Jan. 19, 1973, featured a starry concert at the then-new Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The Philadelphia Orchestra—then and now among the world's finest—conducted by Eugene Ormandy, performed Edvard Grieg's Piano Concerto in a minor, with Van Cliburn, and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

screencap of the National Endowment for the Arts' Opera Honors interview with Leontyne Price
National Endowment for the Arts / Wikimedia Commons

The magnificent American soprano Leontyne Price celebrates her 90th birthday Feb. 10.

Classical 101 by Request invites you to a birthday celebration. We'll be playing your favorite performances by the great lady from 1 to 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10.

To get in on the party, go to wosu.org/requests, and let me know what you'd like to hear.

Opera Columbus

Opera Columbus presents Mozart's The Abduction from the Seraglio in an updated staging, complete with James Bond, dry martinis, beautiful people and villains just waiting to be vanquished.

Showtimes for Mission: Seraglio include 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 (Mozart's 261st birthday) and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29th at the Southern Theatre.

The opera is sung in German, with English-language dialog.

Vimeo

New Netflix original series The Crown is earning critical hosannas and wicked-high TV ratings internationally.

The series traces the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, from her early dewy days as a bride, to a monarch thrust into the position by her father's premature death, which was blamed in part on the selfishness of Edward, Duke of Windsor, who preferred marriage to a American divorcee than life as King of England.

Wikimedia Commons

The world just got a little sadder. The New York Times, Opera News and a variety of print and online screeds are reporting the death of soprano Roberta Peters, at her home in New York, at the age of 86.

Ken Howard/The Metropolitan Opera

Charles Gounod's opera Roméo et Juliette was first performed in Paris in 1867. This year, The Metropolitan Opera is staging a new production of the opera, with Diana Damrau and Vittorio Grigolo in the title roles. 

Happy Music to Beat the Winter Blues

Jan 17, 2017

Every January, when I take down the holiday decorations that adorn my apartment walls, I’m always struck by how abruptly empty my home feels in comparison. A similar feeling comes when I look at my calendar, which seems to shift from endless holiday parties and seasonal social engagements to not much of anything overnight.

Wikipedia

Whether you're in the mood for some Handel or feeling more like Stravinsky's Firebird would light up your day, Classical 101 has something for everyone each week. Daily programming such as The Amadeus Deli provide the staples— the meat and potatoes of Classical repertoire— while special evening shows such as Fretworks and The American Sound add a little spice to the musical palette. 

Be sure to tune in each week, and don't forget to submit your favorite pieces to By Request for Friday afternoons!

Wikipedia

The Johnstone Fund for New Music presents Olivier Messiaen’s Hawari, with Liz Pearse, soprano and Karl Larson, piano, Wednesday, May 27 at 7pm at the Short North Stage. 

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