The American Sound | WOSU Radio

The American Sound

Saturdays at 6 p.m. on Classical 101. Rebroadcast Tuesdays at 7pm on Classical 101.

The American Sound showcases a variety of the most beautiful, inspiring classical music with an American accent.

Each week we’ll explore masterworks by great American composers past and present like Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, and contemporaries Eric Whitacre, Michael Daugherty and John Adams.

Plus, we’ll go back to our American roots with George Gershwin’s jazz-inspired music, performances by America’s bluegrass greats and more. Think Bernstein with the Boston Symphony or Bach on a banjo!

Ways to Connect

color photo of Jason Vieaux
Tyler Boye / jasonvieaux.com

Grammy Award-winning classical guitarist Jason Vieaux calls American composer Jonathan Leshnoff’s Guitar Concerto “a stunner.” Vieaux’s new recording of the concerto with the Nashville Symphony is a stunner, too.

color photo of head shots of poets and composers in The Big SCORE
Johnstone Fund for New Music/publicity photo / used with permission

What would happen if you were to pair six poets with six composers and tell them to create new poems set to music?

Columbus will get the answer to that question May 22 at 7 p.m. in the Short North’s Garden Theater when six new texted musical works by Columbus poets and composers are given their world premieres in a free concert marking the culmination of the innovative poetry and music commissioning project, The Big SCORE.

Jack Gramann

You might be used to hearing tubas doing oom-pahs down in the basement of the musical range. But the world premiere of Columbus composer and tubist Tony Zilincik’s Tuba Concerto on Sunday afternoon might instead have you looking up at the stars.

color photo of anthony williams sitting at an organ
facebook.com/anthonywilliamsorganist/

It’s an unjustly nelected repertoire of music, likely obscured, at least in part, because of racism. Friday evening, one organist will bring some of this music to light in a concert benefiting a project to update the church building of one of Columbus’ oldest African American congregations.

color photo of Frank Lee Ruggles
Don Mears / frankleeruggles.photoshelter.com

Two and a half years ago, two people with strong ties to Delaware, Ohio, met each other when they were being inducted into the Delaware City Schools’ Hall of Fame.

Matthew Bonder

Two brand-new musical works – involving cutting-edge technology and offering commentary on subjects as diverse as a brassy night in Vegas and the wild and woolly world of social media – will receive their world premieres in Columbus this weekend, as Capital University’s Conservatory of Music celebrates its 100th anniversary. 

Dutch rabbits, Dutch tulips, Dutch cocoa, double Dutch.

Seems like everything is going Dutch these days – even the Carpe Diem String Quartet. 

color photo of Scott Ewing and Debra Rentz
Hannah Roberts / Ohio Song Project

Imagine a vocalist singing heartfelt words and beautiful music directly to you.

That’s the kind of intimacy that Columbus’ organization devoted entirely to performing art song aims to create later this month in its first-ever public concert. 

You might still be reeling from the crazy crosswinds that blew through central Ohio last weekend. But recently a totally different kind of breeze blew through the Classical 101 studio when the Columbus-based Tower Duo offered up a sneak peek of its debut recording, Crosswind.

Earlier this year, Classical 101 and the Columbus Museum of Art collaborated for Portraits of Langston, a program featuring music by composers Valerie Coleman and William Grant Still. This weekend, Classical 101 is broadcasting some highlights from that concert.

color photo of the U.S. Constitution
Josh Hallett / Flickr

Democracy has been called the worst form of government except for all the others. In the United States, democracy is inextricably linked with the presidency, that august office which votes fill, which pundits punch and where the buck famously stops for the commonweal. 

color photo of Mark Lomax playing drum set
marklomaxii.com

Four hundred years ago this year, the first African people were taken from their homelands and brought to colonial America – thus instituting slavery in what would become the United States and inflicting profound wounds on individuals and American society that still have not healed. 

color photo of augusta savage sculpture called gamin
Smithsonian American Art Museum

All around the city, Columbus has been celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance in a big way.

As the commemorative events draw to a close later this month, Classical 101 and the Columbus Museum of Art are joining forces Saturday, Jan. 12 for Portraits of Langston, a program featuring music by two groundbreaking composers – one contemporary, one historical.

National Guard Bureau historic files / Flickr

The turn of the calendar year is a study in contrasts. As we reflect on the events of the previous year, we look ahead to the year to come, in all its shining possibility. 

Lisa Marie Mazzucco / simonedinnerstein.com

“I think that he’s kind of like the grandfather of it all.”

That’s what pianist Simone Dinnerstein says about Bach, a composer for whose music she has a particular affinity.

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