All Sides with Ann Fisher

Weekdays 10 a.m. to noon on 89.7 NPR News. Rebroadcast weeknights from 8 to 10 p.m.

All Sides with Ann Fisher is a two-hour, daily public-affairs talk show designed to over time touch upon all sides of the issues and events that shape life in central Ohio. Listeners participate via telephone, e-mail, Facebook and Twitter to add to the conversations. As always at WOSU, the coverage is fair and balanced with a civil tone.

Watch All Sides, weekdays from 10am to noon.

If you have a disability and would like a transcript or other accommodation you can request an alternative format.

How Live Musical Performances Are Surviving Through COVID

Nov 27, 2020
Columbus Symphony cellist performs at a outdoor community concert while wearing a face mask
Broad & High / WOSU

This episode originally aired on Nov. 19, 2020.

Musical performances have been hit particularly hard by COVID-19. Venues are closed for the foreseeable future and many groups have had to lay off performers.

The Columbus Symphony has managed to keep all of its full-time staff and even managed a few concerts this fall with more planned for the holidays.

What COVID-19 Vaccines Could Mean For The Pandemic

Nov 27, 2020
A volunteer receives an injection in Soweto, Johannesburg, as part of Africa's first participation in a COVID-19 vaccine trial developed at the University of Oxford on June 24, 2020.
Siphiwe Sibeko / Pool via AP

This episode originally aired on Nov. 24, 2020.

The chief scientific adviser for Operation Warp Speed says that some Americans could start receiving a COVID-19 vaccine by mid-December.

Dr. Moncef Slaoui cautioned, however, that true herd immunity likely won’t be achieved until May of next year.

A woman with her head in her hands while wearing a mask.
Engin Akyurt / Pixabay

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a type of depression linked to the shortened days of winter.

SAD could be worse this year for people already worn down by months of relative isolation and heading into another holiday season disrupted by the pandemic.

COVID-19's Economic Impact

Nov 25, 2020
Ohio National Guard Specialist Parris Roberts picks up a box of food at the Greater Cleveland Food Bank food distribution, Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak

Low-income Americans have been hit hardest by the pandemic and its economic fallout.

The CARES Act, passed in March, formed the backbone of a state and federal response that helped get people through the spring and summer. But most of that aid has lapsed or will soon.

Tech Tuesday: Tips For Virtual Holiday Gatherings

Nov 24, 2020
Kasumi Loffler / Pexels

A new survey commissioned by Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center finds that 40% of Americans plan to defy medical advice and dine with 10 or more people on Thanksgiving.

What COVID-19 Vaccines Could Mean For The Pandemic

Nov 24, 2020
A volunteer receives an injection in Soweto, Johannesburg, as part of Africa's first participation in a COVID-19 vaccine trial developed at the University of Oxford on June 24, 2020.
Siphiwe Sibeko / Pool via AP

The chief scientific adviser for Operation Warp Speed says that some Americans could start receiving a COVID-19 vaccine by mid-December.

Dr. Moncef Slaoui cautioned, however, that true herd immunity likely won’t be achieved until May of next year.

Holiday Cooking

Nov 23, 2020
Thanksgiving turkey carving
Claudio Schwarz / Unsplash

The holidays are going to be different this year for the millions of Americans heeding the advice of public health officials to stay home and stay safe from COVID-19. But we all still have to eat, just not as much.

With smaller celebrations, home cooks might want to start thinking about how to downsize the family recipes.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Nov 23, 2020
Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks during an interview in Columbus in this Dec. 13, 2019 file photo.
John Minchillo / AP

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has vowed to veto legislation passed by the General Assembly last week that seeks to limit the scope of his state health orders.

The governor called the bill “a disaster” and said it would hamstring efforts to slow record spikes in COVID cases and hospitalizations. And it would tie the hands of future governors.

All Sides Weekend: Books

Nov 20, 2020
stack of books
tookapic / Pixabay

Book publishers predict winter reading lists will be a mix of non-fiction picks that reflect current events and fiction choices that offer escapism.

Other trends include readers reaching for older titles by familiar authors -- the literary equivalent of comfort food.

Kamala Harris's Impact On Women In Politics

Nov 20, 2020
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden's running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during a campaign event at Alexis Dupont High School in Wilmington, Del., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

This episode originally aired on Nov. 17, 2020.

The historic victory of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris has underscored the expanding opportunities for women in politics, from running to office to helping others run.

The 2020 election inspired record numbers of voters to cast their ballots despite the turbulence and danger posed by the pandemic.

How Live Musical Performances Are Surviving Through COVID

Nov 19, 2020
Columbus Symphony cellist performs at a outdoor community concert while wearing a face mask
Broad & High / WOSU

Musical performances have been hit particularly hard by COVID-19. Venues are closed for the foreseeable future and many groups have had to lay off performers.

The Columbus Symphony has managed to keep all of its full-time staff and even managed a few concerts this fall with more planned for the holidays.

History Of Vaccines

Nov 19, 2020
A volunteer is injected with either an experimental COVID-19 vaccine or a comparison shot as part of the first human trials in the U.K. to test a potential vaccine.
University of Oxford via AP

Two pharmaceutical companies, Pfizer and Moderna, have developed coronavirus vaccines that are close to 95 percent effective.

The speedy turnaround in trial results, less than a year after researchers began their work, is record-setting.

Public health experts are concerned the upcoming holiday season will inflame the already surging COVID-19 pandemic.

They’re encouraging people to rethink traditional holiday meals this year with smaller numbers and plenty of precautions, or forgo family gatherings altogether.

Slowing The Spread Of COVID-19

Nov 18, 2020
Gov. Mike DeWine speaks at his daily coronavirus press conference on March 30, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine has issued a 21-day statewide curfew starting tomorrow that requires most retail establishments to close from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

The governor said he opted for a slowdown instead of a shutdown to curb the dramatic rise in coronavirus cases. In Ohio’s hardest hit counties, one out of every 100 people was diagnosed with Covid in the last two weeks.

Tech Tuesday: Cybersecurity During The Pandemic

Nov 17, 2020
Nurse Kathe Olmstead prepares a shot that is part of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y. on July 27, 2020.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Microsoft said Friday that seven pharmaceutical companies working on COVID-related vaccines and drugs were targeted, some successfully, by hackers originating from Russia and North Korea.

Two weeks ago, a ransomware attack took down computers and medical equipment at hospitals across the U.S., delaying some medical procedures and leaving frontline workers using pen and paper.

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