WYSO Weekend: May 17, 2020

May 17, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the cancellation of a lot of summer events in the Miami Valley - Fraze Pavilion concerts, local water parks, and several 4th of July fireworks shows, just to name a few. Other events around the state are sharing that fate. In early March, when Ohio had yet to see a confirmed case of COVID-19, officials decided to drastically pare back the Arnold Sports Festival, one of Columbus’s premier sports events. Now, through public records and interviews compiled for Ohio Public Radio, WOSU’s Nick Evans reconstructs how officials arrived at what they called a gut-wrenching decision.


Almost 600 Indiana prisoners have tested positive for the coronavirus, and 16 have died during the pandemic. When inmates get sick, they may be put in isolation, which means they lose touch with their families. Meanwhile, relatives are left to wonder if an inmate has COVID-19 and say that prisons refuse to disclose even basic information that would put them at ease. Side Effects Public Media’s Jake Harper reports.

Today on Dayton Youth Radio, we have the fourth feature in our Teens In Quarantine series -- with stories from Nick Kvalheim, a student at Oakwood High School and Nicole Henderson, a student at Fairmont High School.

County Lines is WYSO’s series about small towns and rural communities of the Miami Valley. This year we’re bringing you the voices of women living and working in the rural parts of Southwest Ohio. Before the coronavirus pandemic, producer Renee Wilde met with faculty and students at Wilmington College in Clinton County and heard their ideas about rural life and the prospects for a career in agriculture.

Honeybees are remarkable creatures - industrious pollinators necessary for producing most of our food crops like apples, cucumbers, raspberries and pumpkins that grow on Miami Valley farms.  And, of course, for honey.  With wild populations dwindling, most honeybees are now kept as willing workers by human beekeepers.  Community Voices producer Jim Kahle talks with Greg and Melody Blatt of Bellbrook about their path to a new hobby.

Greg Adams joined the Marine Corps in 1977 because he wanted a military career like the ones he saw in the movies. But he struggled during his service with drug abuse and the stereotypes of Marines as bad boys. Today on Veterans’ Voices, Marine Corps veteran Greg Adams of Springfield talks to his daughter, Mellissa Clancy, about the Marine he was then, and the father he is today.

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