Second Amendment Sanctuaries

Jan 23, 2020

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss a county in southern Ohio that just passed a "Second Amendment sanctuary" resolution. 

Michael Hiles, founder of the group Ohio Stands United, which supports these resolutions, joins the show.

Listen to Snollygoster on the WOSU Public Media mobile app, on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. And make sure to leave a rating and review!

On this week's episode:

Safety for Guns

Lawrence County, Ohio, joined four other counties in the state by passing a resolution to protect the Second Amendment. These counties are being called "Second Amendment sanctuaries." 

The resolutions are largely symbolic and borrow a phrase from so-called "sanctuary cities," where lawmakers have vowed to not cooperate with immigration enforcement efforts. In this case, local governments could not use public funds to enforce illegal or unconstitutional gun laws or ordinances.

Ballot Questions

There could be a couple questions on the statewide ballot in November. One would increase Ohio’s minimum wage to $13 an hour by 2025. Another would allow for same-day voter registration and automatic voter registration when you do state business.

Both ballot initiatives will need nearly a half-million signatures by July to get on the ballot.

Meanwhile, the group Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts has officially ended its effort to repeal the nuclear plant bailout.

Poll Position

A recent poll of Great Lake states shows any Democrat would beat President Trump in Ohio by 9 points.  Among the Democrats running for president, Joe Biden is leading with 31%, followed by Bernie Sanders with 21%. The poll also shows that the economy is the number one issue among Ohio voters.  

Snollygoster Of The Week

Attorney Alan Dershowitz does not shy away from controversial cases in court or political punditry on news networks. Now, he is defending Trump in the Senate impeachment trial, saying that the president should not be impeached because he did not commit a crime.

That's a change from 1998, when Dershowitz said a president does not have to commit a crime to be impeached. 

Send questions and comments to snollygoster@wosu.org.