Scott Detrow | WOSU Radio

Scott Detrow

Hoping to regain momentum as two rival candidates creep closer in the polls, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders returned to his signature policy theme in a major speech Wednesday: a single-payer, "Medicare for All" health insurance system.

"The time is now to go forward. The time is now to expand Medicare to every man, woman, and child in this country," Sanders told supporters and reporters in Washington, D.C.

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Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders made the case today for eliminating private health insurance and shifting the country to a single-payer Medicare system.

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Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET

President Trump has made undoing the Obama Administration's foreign policy record one of his top priorities. So it's no surprise that former Vice President Joe Biden — who played a key role in implementing now-abandoned agreements like the Paris climate agreement and the Iran nuclear deal, sees Trump's foreign policy as a disaster.

Former Vice President Joe Biden has referred to himself as "middle class Joe" throughout his political career, and used to regularly joke about being the "poorest person on Congress."

Those terms no longer apply.

Biden and his wife, Jill, have together earned more than $15 million since Biden left office. That's according to tax returns and other financial disclosure forms released by Biden's campaign on Tuesday. The bulk of the Bidens' earnings come from book sales and paid speaking engagements – two routine sources of income for former high-ranking public officials.

When I think of Bud Selig, I always think about one particular moment.

It's the 11th inning of the 2002 All-Star Game. The event was held in Selig's hometown Milwaukee, in the beautiful new ballpark he and his family spent a decade fighting to get built. But instead of reveling in what should have been one of the greatest moments of his life, the Major League Baseball commissioner was frustrated, angry and holding his hands out in an exasperated shrug.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren spent most of the spring as the Democratic presidential hopeful on the rise.

Her poll numbers steadily ticked up, as she carved out a spot as a policy-focused candidate whose weekly plan rollouts set much of the broader campaign agenda.

The momentum translated to fundraising. Warren took in $19.1 million in April, May and June — more than three times what her campaign raised during the first quarter of 2019, according to her campaign Monday.

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One of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders's most animated moments in Thursday night's Democratic debate came after California Rep. Eric Swalwell urged voters to "pass the torch" to a new generation of leaders.

Swalwell's critique was aimed at former Vice President Joe Biden. But despite the fact that Sanders has been increasingly critical of Biden's policy positions, the independent Senator tried to rush to his fellow septuagenarian's defense. "As part of Joe's generation, let me respond," he urged the moderators in the middle of a candidate free-for-all.

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It was the same stage in Miami - many of the same questions but different Democrats, all vying to become the next president of the United States, each fighting to stand out from the crowd.

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A Democratic presidential debate last night offered a chance to move beyond slogans that are short enough to fit on a hat. You know, Donald Trump had "Make America Great Again." Before that, Barack Obama had a single word on a poster - "Hope."

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Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET Thursday

A former vice president, four senators, a representative, a former governor, a mayor and a pair of entrepreneurs walk onto a stage ... where 10 other candidates tried to get their messages across to voters on Wednesday night.

Millions of television viewers are getting their first extended look at the historically sprawling Democratic primary field over two nights in Miami this week.

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