Sarah Taylor

A Northeast Ohio native, Sarah Taylor graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio where she worked at her first NPR station, WMUB. She began her professional career at WCKY-AM in Cincinnati and spent two decades in television news, the bulk of them at WKBN in Youngstown (as Sarah Eisler). For the past three years, Sarah has taught a variety of courses in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State, where she is also pursuing a Master’s degree. Sarah and her husband Scott, have two children. They live in Tallmadge.

The future of Ohio’s two nuclear plants remains up in the air as a bailout package, House Bill 6, works its way through the state legislature. The package would throw a lifeline to bankrupt FirstEnergy Solutions. Its former parent company, FirstEnergy hosted shareholders at its annual meeting in Akron Tuesday. Protesters were there too.  

Kent State and its faculty appear close to an agreement on a new contract.

This follows a fact finder's recommendation. He met with the two sides in April to try to help them break an impasse they came to last fall over salary increases and medical benefits.

Professors sought an average increase of 3-point-3 percent over 3 years, pointing to record enrollment last fall as well as the sound financial position the university described in its advertisement for a new president. 

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Ohioans are being bombarded with an ad campaign focused on an energy bill—House Bill 6—that’s being debated in the state legislature.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing plans for the next phase of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The effort began in 2010 and has funded more than 4,000 improvement projects totaling $2.4 billion.

The next phase is set to begin in September and be carried out over the next five years. It’s moving forward despite President Trump’s initial plan to de-fund it.  

Lawmakers fought to have funding restored, but Senator Sherrod Brown said the president’s view of the project is a concern.

It’s orange barrel season and one of our listeners asked our OH Really team an interesting question about sharing the road in construction zones.

We helped him find the answer.

On route 8 in northern Summit County, traffic has been reduced to two lanes in each direction and concrete barriers are set up as crews resurface a six mile section of the road. There are signs throughout the construction zone that illustrate listener Seth Marks’ concern.  

When we hear about infrastructure, most of us probably think of roads and bridges. But there is plenty of underground infrastructure you can’t see--unless you get a behind the scenes tour, which a small group did Tuesday at Edgewater Beach in Cleveland.

"I wouldn’t suggest touching everything all of the time and rollin’ around in there."

Senator Sherrod Brown is pleased that General Motors is investing $700 million in three Ohio plants, Parma, Toledo, and Moraine. But he said the company needs to provide more information about what’s next for the Lordstown facility.

Between February 2017 and this March, GM cut nearly 4,500 workers at the Lordstown plant. Some of them have taken jobs at GM plants elsewhere. But others are still figuring out what’s next. News that the Lordstown plant will be sold to electric vehicle maker Workhorse offers some hope, but Brown said workers need to know more.

Mark Franko, 28-year General Motors employee, holds an American flag as employees gather outside the plant, Wednesday, March 6, 2019, in Lordstown, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

News about a possible buyer for the General Motors plant in Lordstown is generating a lot of interest in Workhorse, the Cincinnati company involved in the deal.

Voters in a Portage County school district approved two new levies, averting a financial crisis. It’s the first time in 28 years that Field Local Schools will be getting new tax dollars. Voters have renewed levies in the past but have not approved an increase since 1991.

Levy co-chair Erin Roberts has worked on levy campaigns for the past eight years. She says they used a variety of tools to get their message out this time around: social media, robo-calls, text messaging and print fliers.

Humboldt penguins have a median life expectancy of 16.5 years. Emmanuelle, known as Emma, at the Akron Zoo lived to be 36. The Zoo had retired Emma in 2013. She was suffering from age-related problems. When she stopped responding to treatment last week, they humanely euthanized her.  

The Zoo says Emma was the oldest, zoo-born female Humboldt penguin in any facility accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. She hatched April 23, 1983 at the Milwaukee County Zoo and came to Akron in October 2004. 

Kent State's board of trustees voted Monday morning to appoint current university Executive Vice President and Provost Todd Diacon as the university's next president. Diacon will take over when current president Beverly Warren retires July 1.

Erik Drost / Flickr

The term “green economy” refers to growth that’s environmentally friendly. The head of the Cleveland Water Alliance says there’s a new term growing in regional importance: the “blue economy.”

A major foundation that supports entrepreneurs in northeast Ohio is putting its focus on Akron. The Burton D. Morgan Foundation is based in Hudson. It’s spent the past 18 months reviewing its strategy. Foundation president and CEO Deb Hoover said they’ve long supported entrepreneurs of all ages across Northeast Ohio. But now they see an opportunity to focus on adults starting businesses in Akron.

Congressman Tim Ryan talks to boxing legend and Youngstown native Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini at Ryan's first presidential campaign rally held in downtown Youngstown. Ryan joked he would hire Mancini as his White House secretary.
Kabir Bhatia / WKSU

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, who represents Akron and the Youngstown area, is running for president, but to say he’s a dark horse might be an understatement.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

With nearly 20 candidates now vying for the Democratic presidential nomination, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) says he’s comfortable with his decision not to join the race.

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