Paige Pfleger | WOSU Radio

Paige Pfleger

Reporter

Paige Pfleger is a reporter and audio producer from Detroit, Michigan. Before joining the staff of WOSU, Paige worked in the newsrooms of NPR, Vox, Michigan Radio, WHYY and The Tennessean.

She spent three years in Philadelphia covering health, science, and gender, and her work has appeared nationally in The Washington Post, Marketplace, Atlas Obscura and more. As a freelancer, Paige traveled to Puerto Rico to cover how the island’s agricultural community dealt with damage from Hurricane Maria.

A high school in Columbus welcomed its first set of unique students this month. They have all struggled with addiction to drugs or alcohol. Heartland High School is the state’s first recovery school.

A selection of produce at the Veggie Van in Linden. The project launched this summer, bringing fresh fruit and vegetables to Columbus' food deserts.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Monique Williams McCoy greets everyone walking down Cleveland Avenue like a neighbor.

"Hey y’all!" she calls out. "You coming over to check it out today, right? Over to the mobile market?"

Ohio State Fair ride Kissell's Military Base was permanently shut down Thursday.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

The Ohio Department of Agriculture has shut down the Kissell's Military Base ride at the Ohio State Fair. Four more rides are currently not operate pending further inspection.

Ohio Theatre
Jrdphotography / Wikimedia Commons

Opponents of Columbus’ ticket tax came up short on collecting signatures to put a ballot measure in front of voters in November. 

The new CHOICES domestic violence shelter which opened in January and can accomodate up to 120 people and currently has a waitlist of more than 40 people.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Summer is here and for some domestic violence shelters in Central Ohio, that means an increase in people seeking services. 

The main entrance to Mount Carmel West Hospital is shown Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019.
Andrew Welsh-Huggins / Associated Press

Mount Carmel Health System announced Michael Englehart will take over as interim CEO on July 25.

Alyssa, left, discusses her academic record with teacher Leslie MacNabb.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Bouncing on a purple exercise ball, Alyssa talks to her new teacher about what classes she needs to graduate.

Mount Carmel

Mount Carmel Health System announced Thursday that CEO Ed Lamb will resign at the end of the month, following an investigation into "excessive" painkiller dosing by a former doctor. The hospital also fired 23 employees, including five members of the management team, involved in the cases.

Carlos Malvestutto works on infectious diseases at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

There are about 230 new cases of HIV in Franklin County every year, mostly among people aged 25-29. On Thursday, celebrated as National HIV Testing Day, free testing is available at multiple locations across the city. 

Marchers making their way across the Main Street Bridge. Columbus teachers are protesting tax abatements as their union negotiates a new contract.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The Columbus Board of Education is expected to vote Tuesday on a contingency plan for a possible teacher strike.

Mount Carmel's new hospital in Grove City.
Mount Carmel Health System

A man who contracted Legionnaires’ disease after a stay at Mount Carmel Grove City filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the hospital system.

Deepa Halaharvi is a morning person.

"Eat, read, pray, and get ready to go to work," she says, laughing. "And usually I’m out the door around 6:15 or 6:30."

William Husel appears at a Franklin County Courthouse on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. He's charged with 25 counts of murder.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Fired Mount Carmel doctor William Husel posted bond Friday, a few days after being charged with 25 counts of murder. Bond was set at $1 million.

The campus of Mount Carmel West in Columbus on Jan. 30, 2019.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Franklin County prosecutors concluded their six-month investigation into fired Mount Carmel doctor William Husel by charging him with 25 counts of murders. But what about the nurses and pharmacists who worked alongside Husel?

An Ohio doctor being investigated for the suspicious deaths of dozens of hospital patients has been charged with 25 counts of murder.

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