Paige Pfleger | WOSU Radio

Paige Pfleger

Reporter

Paige Pfleger is a reporter and audio producer from Detroit, Michigan. Before joining the staff of WOSU, Paige worked in the newsrooms of NPR, Vox, Michigan Radio, WHYY and The Tennessean.

She spent three years in Philadelphia covering health, science, and gender, and her work has appeared nationally in The Washington Post, Marketplace, Atlas Obscura and more. As a freelancer, Paige traveled to Puerto Rico to cover how the island’s agricultural community dealt with damage from Hurricane Maria.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

William Wood answers the door to his suburban Columbus home with a Glock 19 on his hip. His two toddler-aged children, Daisey and Wesley, peak out from behind his legs.  

ADAMH / Facebook

The Columbus Area Integrated Health Services closed last spring, leaving hundreds without care on the Near East Side. Soon they’ll have a new option for health services.

This Jan. 8, 2001. file photo shows the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) in Youngstown, Ohio, the state's highest security prison.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

An Ohio State University analysis of state, county and federal data suggests racial disparities in criminal sentencing have declined. 

The Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Christ Hospital

A Central Ohio family is suing a fertility clinic in Cincinnati, after finding out the clinic used a stranger’s sperm more than two decades ago.

Riverside Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.
Sixflashphoto / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio Health is raising its minimum wage from $12 an hour to $15.

Auditor Dave Yost (left) discusses the bill alongside Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville), the chair of the Health, Human Services and Medicaid committee.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost joined several other state attorneys general in a letter to Congress that requests increased health care access for people struggling with opioid addiction.  

A recovery vehicle moves a sled down a track after a test of a Hyperloop One propulsion system, Wednesday, May 11, 2016, in North Las Vegas, Nev.
John Locher / Associated Press

Statehouse visitors on Monday will get a first look at the XP-1, a prototype of the vehicle Virgin expects to use in Hyperloop systems like the one proposed for Columbus. It's the hyperloop's second stop in Columbus, after appearing in front of COSI on Sunday.

Ohio State associate head coach Patrick Klein in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, in Hartford, Conn.
Jessica Hill / Associated Press

Ohio State's Athletics Department announced Friday that Patrick Klein has resigned from his position as associate head coach of the women's basketball team.

Rawpixel / Pexels

The number of Ohio kids enrolled in benefit programs like Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) has dropped. 

Volunteers at the Buren Shelter assemble bags of free tampons for shelter residents.
Esther Honig / WOSU

Columbus City Council voted Monday to provide free menstrual products at all the city's recreation centers.

A high school in Columbus welcomed its first set of unique students this month. They have all struggled with addiction to drugs or alcohol. Heartland High School is the state’s first recovery school.

A selection of produce at the Veggie Van in Linden. The project launched this summer, bringing fresh fruit and vegetables to Columbus' food deserts.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Monique Williams McCoy greets everyone walking down Cleveland Avenue like a neighbor.

"Hey y’all!" she calls out. "You coming over to check it out today, right? Over to the mobile market?"

Ohio State Fair ride Kissell's Military Base was permanently shut down Thursday.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

The Ohio Department of Agriculture has shut down the Kissell's Military Base ride at the Ohio State Fair. Four more rides are currently not operate pending further inspection.

Ohio Theatre
Jrdphotography / Wikimedia Commons

Opponents of Columbus’ ticket tax came up short on collecting signatures to put a ballot measure in front of voters in November. 

The new CHOICES domestic violence shelter which opened in January and can accomodate up to 120 people and currently has a waitlist of more than 40 people.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Summer is here and for some domestic violence shelters in Central Ohio, that means an increase in people seeking services. 

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