Paige Pfleger

Reporter

Paige Pfleger is a reporter for WOSU. She's especially interested in the intersection of public health and criminal justice. Before joining the staff of WOSU, she worked in the newsrooms of NPR, Vox, Michigan Radio, WHYY and The Tennessean.

She spent three years in Philadelphia covering health, science, and gender, and her work has appeared nationally in The Washington Post, Marketplace, Atlas Obscura and more. As a freelancer, Paige traveled to Puerto Rico to cover how the island’s agricultural community dealt with damage from Hurricane Maria.

Ways to Connect

In this April 16, 2018 file photo, Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference at a Kroger supermarket as the company announces new associate benefits attributed to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Starting next year, states will have the ability to use money dedicated to the opioid crisis for combatting other forms of drug use. 

William Husel appears at a Franklin County Courthouse on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. He's charged with 25 counts of murder.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Ten former Mount Carmel employees are bringing a lawsuit against the hospital system, in which they back fired doctor William Husel. 

A fracking explosion in Belmont County in February 2018 created one of the worst methane leaks in U.S. history.
Ohio State Highway Patrol Aviation Section

In February 2018, an explosion at a fracking site in Belmont County, near the Ohio-West Virginia border, forced residents within a 1-mile radius to evacuate their homes for several weeks.

A study this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that the accident resulted in one of the largest methane leaks ever recorded in the U.S.

Bradley Paramore stands inside the new School Safety Center.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Tuesday was the inaugural meeting of a new school safety working group, created by Gov. Mike DeWine to prevent threats or acts of violence in schools. 

Rawpixel / Pexels

new study from Georgetown University Center for Children and Families revealed there are about 10,000 more uninsured 0-to-6 year olds than two years ago.

Paramedic Scott Widener crouches in the back of an outfitted ambulance.

“I am six foot and I’m duckin',” he says, laughing.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

"It’s a typical mammogram room—if you went to a hospital it would look exactly the same," says mammographer Valerie Rice. "It’s nothing really different, except that it’s in a moving vehicle!"

A meat locker of deer at Mosley's Meat Market in Hilliard.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Warning: This story contains vivid descriptions and images of how a deer is butchered.

Ohio opened its deer-hunting season to hunters with guns this week, which means butchers like Jay Mosley of Mosley's Meat Market are working overtime. 

A deer in Mill Creek Park in Youngstown, Ohio.
Jeff Bryant / Flickr

Monday kicks off Ohio’s annual week for hunting deer with guns.

Paramedics Scott Widener (left) and Mike Warnimont (right) prepare the mobile stroke unit for the day.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Paramedic Scott Widener crouches in the back of an outfitted ambulance.

“I am six foot and I’m duckin',” he says, laughing.

In many Midwest states it’s illegal for someone with HIV to have sex without telling partners about the illness. Some public health experts are pushing to change those laws.

The Mirror Lake Eatery on Ohio State University's campus in 2018.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It seems there is a new tradition ahead of the big Michigan game. Ohio State University students woke up Friday morning to find that Mirror Lake had been drained overnight. 

Franklin County Sheriff's cruiser
Raymond Wambsgans / Flickr

The Franklin County Sheriff's Office is reviewing pursuit policies after a car chase resulted in a crash last week. 

HIV testing at Mozaic, an Equitas Health clinic in Columbus.
Equitas Health

Graig Cote has had HIV for 33 years, and he wants everyone to know it.

The RREACT cars are part of a program to provide overdose victims with treatment.
Columbus City Council

Columbus City Council recently voted to invest more in an innovative program to help connect people who overdose with treatment.

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