Nathan Reineck

Nathan joined WKSU as an intern in May 2019. Nathan is a broadcast journalism student at Kent State. He’s previously been a correspondent for TV2 as well as a crew member of Teleproductions. His interests include entertainment and culture.

One of Kent’s largest businesses is expanding its headquarters and expects to add as many as 200 support workers as it grows over the next decade. Davey Tree Expert Company said the expansion will begin next spring and double the size of its current headquarters building located at 1500 N. Mantua St.

The City of Akron is launching an app to make recycling easier for its residents. The “Akron Recycles” app can be downloaded on all mobile devices. The app shows pickup times and classifies recyclable items. Akron’s recycling manager, Dan Dempsey, said the new tool is another way to make Akron sustainable.

“It is just another tool that our residents have. Certainly, the better educated our residents are on recycling, the better recyclers they will be. We are trying to give our residents every tool available to make Akron a sustainable city.”

Cuyahoga Valley National Park has opened what it’s calling its first “Front Door."

The Boston Mill Visitor Center is on Riverview Road in Peninsula. Park Superintendent Craig Kenkel hopes the new center will bring some new faces as well.

"We see this as being a place for those first time visitors who know nothing about Cuyahoga Valley and Northeast Ohio, but it’s also a place where returning visitors and local visitors can come and learn more about our interpretive scenes and the stories that comprise the National Park as well as its connection to Cleveland and Akron."

A Cleveland Indians player is being awarded the prestigious Roberto Clemente award. It was announced Friday that the award would be given to pitcher Carlos 'Cookie' Carrasco. Carrasco said reading stories about Clemente’s dedication to the community and humanitarian efforts inspired him.

“When I get to read his stories, I say, ‘I just want to be like him,’ because that’s the way that I love to help in the community. And that’s the way that I am. And that’s the step that I want to follow too.”

A local legislator is looking for ways Ohio can protect provisions of the Affordable Care Act. A federal court  is expected to rule soon on a Texas case that could strike down the ACA. State representative Randi Clites from Ravenna said that could jeopardize health care for people with pre-existing conditions. A bill she is proposing would protect families going through situations like her own.

Ohio has been at the forefront of engineering self-driving cars. The state transportation department wants to hear what citizens have to say about the future of Ohio roads and highways. It’s hosting a public meeting Monday in Akron to gather ideas for improving the state’s transportation system over the next 25 years. ODOT spokesman Matt Bruning said they will show their plans and listen to the community.

A number of Republicans have questioned President Donald Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria. Sen. Rob Portman said the placement of troops in northern Syria has brought stability to the region. He said taking troops out was a mistake.

“We’ve seen chaos descend. Not just on the Kurds, but also on others who live in that area who are now refugees and then also giving the opportunity for other forces to come in.”

United Auto Workers (UAW) at General Motors (GM) are expected to vote this weekend on a tentative deal negotiators have reached with the company. UAW workers who lost their jobs when GM Lordstown shut down in March had hoped the national agreement would include a future for their plant. Sen. Rob Portman said it’s disappointing that it doesn’t.

The opioid addiction crisis has far-reaching effects. The University of Akron has received a federal grant to help families dealing with a loved one’s addiction. Associate Professor of Counseling Rikki Patton said students will complete a training program and then get hands-on practice.

The University of Akron is experimenting with new ideas to enhance sustainability and foster a better relationship with the City of Akron. Faculty and students are working together to establish a plan to make it happen. Anthropology professor, Carolyn Behrman, said they’re focusing on four areas including water, polymers, food, and the university’s identity as it prepares to celebrate its 150th anniversary. She said the launch of the nine-month effort coincides with the arrival of the university’s new president Gary Miller.

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke is continuing his campaign with town halls at several Ohio colleges. Wednesday night O’Rourke visited Kent State University to speak to close to 400 people about his plans. 

A social service organization is getting help to prevent homelessness. Coleman Professional Services is receiving a $75,000 grant from Anthem Blue Cross and Shield to help landlords provide rapid rehousing for individuals facing homelessness in northeast Ohio. Vice President of Clinical Services at Coleman, Tammy Weaver, said transitional housing helps people stabilize and get back on their feet.

Senator Rob Portman is working to avert another government shutdown, which he says could happen in 13 days because of disagreements about diverting military funding to a border wall. 

He released a report Tuesday, showing how costly these shutdowns are. He said three government shutdowns have cost citizens nearly $4 billion over the last five years. Portman has introduced the End Government Shutdowns Act. It would decrease funding incrementally until Congress reaches a budget agreement.

A local organization is trying a new way to satisfy the community’s cravings for traditional Jewish food. Every other year, Temple Israel Sisterhood hosts the Art and Jewish Food Festival in Akron.

The president of the Lorain school board said there’s no risk that employees will not be paid. Mark Ballard responded to comments from the district's CEO David Hardy. Hardy wrote staff saying a restraining order from the school board would prevent him from hiring a new treasurer to handle payroll. Ballard called Hardy an "unqualified dictator."

“First of all, we know state law is never going to allow teachers who are doing their job to not get paid, or public employees not to get paid. So that was a false narrative that he put out.”

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