Lucas Misera

Lucas is a senior majoring in both economics and finance from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Prior to this internship at WKSU, he interned at the Lake County Ohio Port and Economic Development Authority as a research intern.  He currently serves as the opinion editor for The Kent Stater. Along the way, he’s also held several jobs within Kent State, from working as a tour guide to conducting research with professors in the economics department at the university.

After his time at Kent State, he hopes to continue on to study economics at the graduate level and, in the long term, conduct actionable research focused around inequality of opportunity.

Flashstarts, a Cleveland business accelerator, is making its first investment of this year in an Akron-based company that grows 3D models of tumors.

OncoSolutions produces the models and uses them to test possible cancer treatments from pharmaceutical companies.

Dr. Stephanie Ham is the cofounder and CEO of OncoSolutions.

  

The city of Akron is trying to play a bigger role in guiding local startups.

Tuesday is the third Akron Entrepreneurs Meet-up event organized by the mayor’s office.

Heather Roszczyk is the innovation and entrepreneurship advocate for the city. She says bringing local entrepreneurs together helps business owners identify common problems and what the city can offer.  


Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center are teaming up to research complications associated with psoriasis.

The National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases is giving the project a $6.5 million grant.

The grant will help researchers better understand psoriasis and its comorbidities, the other ailments that come with it.

A recent Gallup poll reveals that only a third of students feel confident their college education will adequately prepare them for the job market.

Laura Carey is the director of Career Services at the University of Akron. She says while mastering the fundamentals will help college grads land jobs, it’s not the only thing employers look for. Developing “soft skills” can help students stand out.


New business startup rates in Ohio and across the U.S. remain low despite a growing economy. The latest study from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland offers one explanation for the trend. 

Student entrepreneurs from Case Western Reserve University will be showcasing their products at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week.

The show is an opportunity for innovators around the world to mingle with buyers and suppliers, as well as potential investors.

Bob Sopko is with the students this week in Vegas. He is the director of Case’s LaunchNet program, which helps students start and manage their own businesses.

A Northeast Ohio school district is developing a website to connect students with manufacturing jobs in Lake and Geauga counties.

The site, NextWork, allows employers to interact with students by posting job openings and hosting forums to learn more about manufacturing.

Wickliffe Superintendent Joe Spiccia sees the site as a way for students not heading to college to find good-paying jobs.


A new report finds that minority-owned businesses have a more difficult time getting credit from lenders than companies with white owners.

BioEnterprise is welcoming one of the first new tenants to Cleveland’s Global Center for Health Innovation since becoming its strategic planner recently.

Pittsburgh-based MedRespond develops interactive online programs that guide patients through a range of options from recovering from surgery to paying for their procedures.

A Kent State University computer-science professor has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to further his development of eye-tracking software.

Jonathan Maletic will work with Youngstown State University professor Bonita Sharif on their project, iTrace.

Current technology tracks where viewers’ eyes range on a webpage but doesn’t accommodate scrolling or switching from one page to another, a problem iTrace aims to fix.

Maletic expects his project will help researchers better understand how computer scientists scan lines of code.

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