Leticia Wiggins | WOSU Radio

Leticia Wiggins

Multimedia Producer

Ways to Connect

Holly and Spencer Gross smiling with StoryCorps COLUMBUS logo
storycorps / WOSU

Holly Gross grew up across the pond in England. Her husband Spencer has lived in Ohio his whole life. When it comes to politics, Holly is liberal and Spencer is conservative. Even still, this couple managed to fall in love, and they agree their differences bring them closer together.

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee
storycorps

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee had their hearts broken when crews demolished one of Columbus’s most famous landmarks. But the loss of the historic building also started their lives together.

Jonathon W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathon W. Tolbert IV
storycorps

John W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathan W. Tolbert IV, remember the legacy of Marshall "Major" Taylor, a professional African American cyclist who stormed the cycling scene and broke racial barriers in the late 1800s.

Major Taylor became the inspiration for a Columbus-based bicycle club that’s now 40 years old. John III told his son they didn’t know much about cycling when they started, and none of them had heard of the man who would be the club’s namesake.   

photo of  John and Jane Byrnes
storycorp

Katie Byrnes was born deaf, but this didn’t stop her from finding ways to relate to others.

Her parents, Jayne and John Byrnes remember Katie’s earliest signs of communicating, her intelligence and love of music. Even though Katie passed at the young age of five-years-old, she had an incredible impact on the deaf community.

Miguel Tucker gives a speech to graduating Building Futures class.
Rivet / WOSU

Miguel Tucker, 30, grew up in Columbus. As a kid, he says, he spent a lot of time around negative influences.

Danavan McIntosh programs the 3-D printer in a tech lab at Goodwill Columbus.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

During an early shift at FedEx, Danavan McIntosh made his way down a tall ladder. He'd done it a million times before. This time, he felt himself falling.

Amanda Wisniewski (right) and friend Caitlin Wingfield, who she met on the job, enjoy a Columbus crew game.
Courtesy of Amanda Wisniewski

Amanda Wisniewski discovered her niche while processing specimens at medical testing company, LabCorp.

“I found what I wanted to do forever, because something just clicked,” she says. “Working on the robotics and fixing the problems, it was the highlight of my day.”

Dashawn Hodge found his first job through the Boys and Girls Club's Summer Work Program.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

Dashawn Hodge is just a normal 14-year-old boy who hates cutting the grass.

“My mom told me when I get home, I gotta cut the grass,” he says. “I looked at her like, ‘No, I can’t cut the grass!”

Jordan Washington switched careers to be an electrician, which he's learning on the job as part of a five-year apprenticeship.
Rivet / WOSU

Driving a semi-truck is a job that gives you plenty of time to think – too much, actually, for Jordan Washington. He says the job paid well, and it was fun in the beginning until the monotony sunk in.

“But then after a while, I’m just like, 'O.K., I’m bored. This is not for me,’” Washington says.

Erica Miller at the Stanley Electric plant in London, Ohio.
LETICIA WIGGINS / WOSU

Like most kids, Erica Miller loved riding the merry-go-round when she was little.  Her mom took her often to the one at the Columbus Zoo. Miller was always more interested in the gears than the ponies, though.