Lauren Bavis

Lauren a reporter and editor based at WFYI in Indianapolis. She maintains Side Effects' website, social media accounts (which you can follow on Facebook and Twitter) and newsletter (which you should sign up to get weekly). Lauren graduated from Towson University and moved to Indiana in 2012, where she began her career as a newspaper reporter. She reported on health and social services for the Bloomington Herald-Times. Her work has been recognized by the Indiana chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists and Associated Press Media Editors, as well as the Hoosier State Press Association.  

The opioid epidemic has ravaged cities across the United States. And just a couple of years ago, Dayton, Ohio, had one of the nation’s worst overdose death rates. Now, overdose deaths have decreased, and Ohioans impacted by addiction are sharing stories of hope.

Some doctors see access to birth control as a tool in the fight to decrease maternal and infant mortality. Indiana has one of the nation’s worst rates of new mothers and infants dying, and those rates are even worse for black women.

But a history of abuse has led to distrust of health care professionals in communities of color. 

In another step to lower its high maternal death rate, Indiana has joined the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health.

The alliance is a national group of public health organizations and hospitals that works to reduce poor birth outcomes. It analyzes hospital data and provides training materials on addressing health complications during pregnancy.

Melody Lynch-Kimery had a fairly routine pregnancy. But when she got to the hospital for delivery, she says things quickly turned dangerous.

Storytellers from Side Effects series SOBER: Stories of Recovery and Hope joined WFYI's No Limits program to discuss the importance of sharing their experiences to help others in the recovery community.

Listen to the full conversation on WFYI, and read the stories on Side Effects.

On Tuesday, a panel of experts tackled the subject of maternal and infant mortality -- and the unequal burden on African-Americans in Indiana. They dove into a wide range of issues -- from low breast-feeding rates to the implicit bias of some doctors -- and shared some grim statistics.   

In 2018, Side Effects covered community struggles with public health crises, barriers to treatment and clever workarounds to get vulnerable people the care they need. 

The Indiana Repertory Theatre has performed “A Christmas Carol” for almost 30 years. But this year’s final performance starts a little differently.

Side Effects Public Media reporters will produce Season Two of  The Workaround podcast with help from the  Massachusetts-based media company PRX.

The Workaround, which highlights problems in the U.S. health care system, was selected for the second round of PRX's Project Catapult, a podcast training program focused on public media. 

Health care was a big campaign issue across the Midwest, and Tuesday's election results were mixed. Among the winners: medical marijuana.

Indiana suspended a Medicaid policy that locked participants out of coverage for failing to confirm their eligibility for health care with the state.

The eighth graders who dashed around the classroom sounded like parrots in a pet store. The students asked each other the same question over and over.