Kelly Woodward

Kelly Murphy Woodward, a regional Emmy Award-winning producer, loves to tell a good story and has been privileged to do that for more than 20 years, working in public television and radio, commercial news and running her own production business. She is passionate about producing quality programming for Northeast Ohio.

Stark Country resident Don Woodward mails in his new absentee ballot application ahead of the election in November.
Kelly Woodward / WKSU

Stark County resident Don Woodward guessed he was mistakenly signed up for poll worker training when he got an envelope from the county’s board of elections the other week. Instead, he found out he had made a mistake on his absentee ballot application.

Lawsuits over the number of ballot drop boxes are making their way through the courts in Ohio, with anger flaring on both sides of what has become an increasingly partisan issue.

Ohio’s Democratic Party wants the secretary of state to allow more than one per county, while Republicans are pushing to keep things as they are.

Kelly Woodward with WKSU’s Election Protection team takes a closer look at the latest fray – and what it means for the health of  democracy in Ohio.

The cloud of COVID-19 is especially heavy for expectant parents. As part of our Informed Communities Series on Infant Mortality, WKSU brings you insights from Northeast Ohio doctors and researchers on how to stay safe and minimize stress during pregnancy.

With COVID-19 straining public health care, Stark County is taking a practical approach to help families vulnerable to infant mortality. The THRIVE program has shown significant progress in reducing the racial disparity that, statewide, reveals Black babies continue to die before their first birthdays at twice the rate of white babies. Now, in this time of the pandemic, community health workers are delivering tools to help families stay safer.        

COVID-19 disproportionately impacts black families, causing a wide range of concerns among people already facing racial unrest, bias in health care, and an infant mortality rate at least twice the rate of white infants statewide. 

Greater Akron’s Full Term First Birthday is encouraging black pregnant women to be especially vigilant to avoid contracting COVID-19.

Very little is known about the impact of the virus on pregnancy or infants.

If you are grieving from the loss of an infant or pregnancy, you are not alone. There is hope and help in Northeast Ohio, particularly for African-American parents, who are, unfortunately, more likely to experience this type of suffering. As part of our Informed Communities’ focus on infant mortality, WKSU introduces people and groups standing by to help you.

 

Infant mortality experts in Northeast Ohio are urging black families to become empowered about their healthcare, especially during pregnancy. As part of our informed communities reporting on infant mortality, we hear why it is important to advocate for yourself in the doctor’s office – and how to do that.

Chronic, maternal  stress is one of the reasons Black babies in Ohio are more than twice as likely not to survive to their first birthdays as white babies.