Julie Grant | WOSU Radio

Julie Grant

The Ohio Health Registry, started by a physician, hopes to sign up 200 people who live near oil and gas activity.
Julie Grant / Allegheny Front

A dozen people are scurrying around a church basement in Youngstown, Ohio. They’re arranging tables and chairs, setting up paperwork, and hanging up signs that read “Ohio Health Registry.”

Leatra Harper started the Freshwater Accountability Project because she worried about oil and gas development harming water resources in Ohio.
Julie Grant / Allegheny Front

Ten years ago, the fracking industry was already booming in Pennsylvania, but people in Ohio were just starting to hear about it. Many were excited that it would help eastern Ohio's struggling rural economy. 

Patrick Hunkler and Jean Backs get drinking water for their house from spring water collected in this cistern. They are concerned that fracking could impact their water.
Julie Grant / Allegheny Front

Deciding what happens on private property might seem like a basic right. But when it comes to energy development, Ohio and other oil and gas-producing states have laws that can force landowners to lease their underground mineral rights to energy companies.

Kerri Bond and Jodi Carter at the auction of property owned by Bond and mineral rights.
Brian Peshek / Allegheny Front

A decade ago, people in Ohio hadn't heard much about fracking for natural gas in the state. But since then, the ups and downs of the gas industry have literally changed the rural landscape of eastern Ohio.

The Cincinnati skyline and John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge is seen from the banks of the Ohio River, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018, in Covington, Ky.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

A multi-state commission charged with ensuring water quality in the Ohio River will consider whether to eliminate its pollution control standards at its meeting on February 14. Thousands of people have expressed opposition during a public comment period, while others argue that the regulations are redundant and have no teeth.

Courtesy of Trina Moore

Residents in Noble County, Ohio, about two hours west of Pittsburgh, are recovering after a natural gas pipeline explosion rocked their community on Monday morning. Two people were injured, and three homes were damaged.

Governor Tom Wolf's Office / Flickr

Along the Ohio River, anticipation is mounting for the next phase of the natural gas industry. Beyond cheap electricity, Ohio is looking to use shale gas to rebuild its manufacturing base.

Allegheny Front

After 40 years, Kerri and Jeff Bond are moving from their small farm in Seneca Lake, Ohio. The rural hillsides have changed in recent years. The trees in their yard started to lose foliage and die last year. Their sheep, chickens and cats died, and their dogs developed tumors.

Evacuation orders are in place for residents in the Powhatan Point area after an explosion and fire at a well pad.
WTOV9

In eastern Ohio's Belmont County, some residents are still evacuated from their homes after a natural gas well explosion last week.

Hunter Franks

Kyle Kutuchief wants more places around Akron for people to just hang around.

To show what he means, he walks onto a newly renovated pedestrian bridge.

“Behold, behold, the grandeur,” Kutuchief says. “We’re standing over a big old highway.”

And this highway, known as the Innerbelt, is empty. Soon, the whole thing will be removed.

For many regional farmers, the most popular weed-killer is becoming less effective. As the Ohio River Radio Consortium's Julie Grant reports, many are reverting to older, harsher chemicals to combat so-called "superweeds."

Ten years ago, Bill Haddad thought he might be out of a job.