Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

A federal judge has temporarily blocked the state from using the coronavirus order that bans elective, non-essential surgeries to stop the six clinics in Ohio that offer surgical abortions from performing those procedures.

Millions of Ohioans are staying home as ordered, as schools have closed, employers have ordered them to work remotely and entertainment options have been shut down. And hundreds of thousands have lost their jobs as businesses shuttered – perhaps temporarily or maybe permanently. All of these sudden changes are having an impact on Ohioans who are now living very different lives than just a few weeks ago.

The more than 10,000 people in Ohio identified as homeless are already at a higher risk for catching communicable diseases but the coronavirus pandemic is making matters worse. 

A sign is taped to a door leading into a polling location at the Messiah Lutheran Church, Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Lyndhurst, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The Ohio Democratic Party has dropped its lawsuit over the postponed primary Election Day, which was called off due to the coronavirus.

The Ohio Democratic Party has dropped its lawsuit over the postponed Election Day. 

College dorm rooms around the state as well as hotel rooms could be converted into hospitals to treat coronavirus patients.
Ohio State University

There are so many coronavirus patients being treated by medical professionals in New York that makeshift tents have been turned into hospitals. Ohio's leaders say they are planning ahead but aren’t looking to do something similar here.

There are so many coronavirus patients being treated by medical professionals in New York that makeshift tents have been turned into hospitals. Ohio's leaders say they are planning ahead but aren’t looking to do something similar here.

Ohio Lottery tickets
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio’s casinos have been closed for almost two weeks, and it's been a week since bars were shut down, including those offering Keno. Ohio Lottery tickets are still being sold, even under the new stay-at-home which went into effect on Tuesday. 

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
Sam Aberle / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential surgical procedures, prompting criticism from abortion rights groups.

Thousands of Ohioans are being laid off as businesses have temporarily shut their doors to prevent the spread COVID 19.

Those businesses and state officials are doing what they can to help those workers and keep the companies afloat.

Thousands of Ohioans are being laid off as businesses have temporarily shut their doors due to efforts to prevent the spread COVID 19. 

It probably comes as no surprise that unemployment claims in Ohio have skyrocketed this week as businesses continue to temporarily close and lay off workers to try to slow the spread of coronavirus.

It probably comes as no surprise that unemployment claims in Ohio have skyrocketed this week as businesses continue to temporarily close and lay off workers to try to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

Some Ohio hospitals were already moving to stop elective surgeries, but now those procedures will be put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

When businesses shut down or lay off employees, they are required to give a notice to the feds and the state. A change intended to make that process easier is being made because of the coronavirus pandemic.


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