Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

tookapic / Pixabay

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a law that allows students in public schools to express their religious beliefs.

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a law that allows students in public schools to express their religious beliefs.

This Jan. 8, 2001. file photo shows the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) in Youngstown, Ohio, the state's highest security prison.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Two bills under consideration in the Ohio legislature would change sentencing for low-level drug crimes to intervention rather than incarceration.

In this March 24, 2020, file photo, members of The Ohio National Guard assist in repackaging emergency food boxes for food distribution at the Cleveland Food Bank in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The Ohio National Guard will soon have to end its pandemic-related missions, including its first assignment in the coronavirus crisis, helping 12 Ohio food banks with the huge job of getting food to increasing numbers of people who need it.

Democrats in the Ohio House say lawmakers need to deal with some important business this summer instead of taking time off.

ballet dancers
Tobias C. Wahl / Pixabay

Nine dance studios are suing the state of Ohio over mandated shutdowns and limitations imposed on their businesses.

Ohio History Connection

The Ohio Constitution bans slavery except for one reason, and at least one Black lawmaker wants that exception stripped from the state’s governing document.

Democrats in the Ohio House say lawmakers need to deal with some important business this summer instead of taking time off. 

Rep. David Leland (D-Columbus) at a press conference with other Ohio House Democrats in 2019.
Ohio House

An Ohio bill would have allowed an extension of benefits to unemployed Ohioans who are at-risk or have medical conditions that could be deadly if they contract COVID-19. The sponsor of that legislation says it's not necessary now that Gov. Mike DeWine issued an executive order.

A bill that would have allowed an extension of benefits to unemployed Ohioans who are at risk or have medical conditions that could be deadly if they contract COVID-19 has been in the works at the Statehouse. But the sponsor of that legislation says it is not necessary now that Gov. Mike DeWine has issued an executive order.

women researcher working on COVID-19 test
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

The Ohio Senate is being asked to consider a bill passed along party lines in the House that requires new reporting standards for COVID-19.

Summertime is prime time for amusement parks, zoos and other venues. But the months of shutdown and the limits on operations – plus safety concerns from consumers – are all having a big impact on communities that rely on tourism dollars.

A bowl of stickers for those taking advantage of early voting, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Steubenville, Ohio.
Gene Puskar / Associated Press

An Ohio group that wanted to put voter reforms on the fall ballot has dropped its effort, after losing court battles to make signature collecting easier during the pandemic. 

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

Voter turnout in Ohio has hovered around 70% in presidential election years, and the Secretary of State predicts turnout will be as high as ever this year. But with lingering concerns about the pandemic, election officials say it's important to get as many Ohioans as possible to vote early.

Voter turnout in Ohio has been around 70 percent in presidential election years, and elections officials think turnout will be high this year as well. But with lingering concerns related to the pandemic, they say it’s going to be important to get as many Ohioans as possible to vote early this November. 

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