Jo Ingles | WOSU Radio

Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Fire Ball Ride Sign
Rusty Clark / Flickr

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed into law a bill that strengthens rules for amusement rides in Ohio.

The Ohio Senate has passed and sent two controversial abortion bills to the Ohio House. One involves abortion reversal, a practice that is not backed by mainstream medical professionals. That other subjects doctors to steep penalties for failing to deal with aborted remains in a particular way. 

Lieutenant governor-elect Jon Husted and governor-elect Mike DeWine celebrate at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed an executive order that establishes an advisory council that will come up with suggestions for how to make it work better for foster families. 

Abortion protesters at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

An Ohio Senate committee has paved the way for the two controversial bills to hit the chamber floor on Wednesday. Both would put restrictions on doctors performing those procedures.

Social Security
Tetra Images - Flickr / Flickr

Ohioans with disabilities are limited on how much they can earn or save and still be eligible for Social Security or Medicaid. Because of that, special savings accounts through the Ohio Treasurer's Office that will allow them to save without losing benefits are gaining in popularity.

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif.
Reed Saxon / AP

Diabetics who depend on insulin to live often find themselves paying hundreds, sometimes more than $1,000 a month, for that medication. A new bill would limit that out of pocket cost to $100 for a one month supply.

The Ohio Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal from the last abortion clinic open in the Dayton area that would allow it to remain in operation. However, the Women’s Center of Dayton isn’t taking “no” for an answer.

Gabriel Mann with NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio said lawyers are now asking a federal court to grant an order to keep the clinic’s doors open.

Ohio's top court is, once again, has refused to hear an appeal from the last abortion clinic in Dayton. It has been fighting with the state to avoid closure of the facility. But the center isn't taking "no" for an answer. It is looking to a federal court to step in now.

The Kettering clinic is the region's only abortion provider still in operation.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The Ohio Supreme Court is again refusing to hear an appeal from the Dayton area's last abortion clinic as the facility fights to avoid closure. In response, the clinic is pursuing a new state license and intervention by a federal court.

Opponents of abortion pill reversal bill gather in front of the  Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

A bill in the Ohio Senate would require doctors to give women who receive medication abortions information on a controversial reversal procedure. Opponents of the legislation got their chance to speak out to an Ohio Senate committee Tuesday.

Opponents of a bill that requires doctors give women getting medication abortions information on a controversial reversal procedure got their chance to speak out to an Ohio Senate committee today. 

Ohio Driver's License
WOSU

A new bill in the Ohio Legislature could ensure you spend less time at the Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

There’s a bill in the Ohio Legislature that its sponsor says will ensure you spend less time at the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. 

An Ohio Senate committee is set to hear from opponents of a bill that would provide what’s being called “reversed abortions.”

When workers who have been injured on the job go to pharmacies to fill prescriptions for opioid painkillers, they will soon be getting something else with it. 

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