Jerry Kenney | WOSU Radio

Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Rep. Mike Turner (R-Dayton) is advising Dayton officials not to hold any counter-protests when a KKK-affiliated group assembles on Courthouse Square on May 25.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an Indiana group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an out-of-state group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

Last month, Montgomery County, which oversees Courthouse Square, granted the Indiana group believed to be affiliated with the KKK permission to rally on May 25th.

With just weeks to go before the tax filing deadline of April 15, many Americans are  expressing surprise over the size of their tax refunds, with many taxpayers finding their federal returns are lower than they were in previous years. Some people who are used to getting a refund are finding they’ll owe the IRS instead this year.

Early on Wednesday, the Montgomery County Fairgrounds was transformed into the aftermath of a terror attack. The scene was part of a special public health training designed to give Miami Valley first responders a chance to practice for a real-world attack. The exercise harnessed an army of actors to simulate what might happen after a chemical, biological, or nuclear strike.

Dayton water officials say they’re waiting for high river levels to drop before they can determine the cause of a massive water main break more than a week ago.

The break in a pipe under the Great Miami River affected residents and businesses across the region and led to the loss of millions of gallons of treated drinking water.

It’s unclear when crews would be able to complete evaluations of the water main rupture.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

The city of Dayton is asking a group associated with the Ku Klux Klan to reconsider its request for a permit to rally in the city.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) visited Dayton on Wednesday to meet with more than 20 local business leaders and state legislators about workforce development. Portman is promoting a number of measures aimed at connecting highly skilled workers with open jobs around the state.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Last week we told you how, some Dayton groups, including Rainbow Elder Care, Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County, and Boonshoft Pride are collecting data to gauge the unique needs of the older LGBT community. Our story featured three people who had genuine concerns about their futures as they get older. In our conversations we also talked about other aspects of their lives….. Coming out to family and friends, and to themselves. We talked about the ideals of community and culture, and so we wanted to share just a little bit more of their stories with you. This segment features Janice James, Joyce Gibbs and Dickie Wilson.


In the wake of a widespread water outage in parts of Montgomery County, where millions of gallons of water leaked from a broken main under the Great Miami River overnight, Dayton Children’s Hospital is urging parents of young children to use health and safety precautions.

Thomas Krzmarzick is Dayton Children’s Division Chief of Emergency Medicine.

He says parents should follow county boil advisories because prevention is better than finding out you’ve ingested contaminated water.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered her State of the City Address on Wednesday morning - her sixth since taking office. The mayor’s speech tackled some of the difficult issues facing the city in the coming year.

Whaley’s more than 20-minute address began with some positives for the city. She outlined milestones reached by the city in education,business, downtown revitalization, and neighborhood investment. The mayor also talked about some of the challenges. These included the opioid crisis and the recent loss of Good Samaritan Hospital.

Next year will mark the 25th anniversary of the 1995 signing of the Dayton Peace Accords, also known as the Dayton Agreement, one of a series of international meetings that led to the end of the Bosnian War.

Since the accord was signed on November 21, 1995, efforts to build the relationship between Dayton and its sister-city, Sarajevo, in Bosnia and Herzegovina have continued. A recent, sizable grant from the U.S. State Department will go a long way in cementing that relationship.

Joyce Gibbs and Janice James have been together for 17 years. The 60-something couple live in a modest, yet comfortable home in Dayton’s Patterson Park. It has a home office for Janice, who works in the defense-contracting industry. For decades, Joyce has made her living as a writer.

Of their lives today, Joyce sums it up in just a few words:

It’s been a big year for Yellow Springs filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar. Their latest documentary “American Factory” had an award winning debut recently at the Sundance Film Festival. Now, a deal with streaming giant Netflix is in the works.

“American Factory,” is a follow-up documentary to Reichert’s and Bognar’s Oscar nominated short -subject film “The Last Truck.” That 2009 documentary highlighted the devastating closure of the longstanding GM Assembly Plant in Moraine.

Concerned by how the harsh winter weather is affecting the city’s homeless population, two Dayton men have organized a winter clothing drive.

Tushar Goswami and Corgi Dixon spent the better part of a very cold Wednesday calling downtown establishments and gathering support for the drive. Several business agreed to serve as drop-off locations.

Goswami says despite designating a handful of warming centers in the area, city resources just aren’t enough to help the homeless through the severe cold weather.

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