Jerry Kenney | WOSU Radio

Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, in the U.S., one in three women and one in six men have experienced some form of sexual violence in their lifetime. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this year YWCA Dayton is taking some big steps to improve and expand their services for victims of Sexual violence.

Thousands of  revelers are expected to gather at the Dayton Art Institute Sunday to celebrate the museum’s 100th birthday.

The landmark Dayton institution has had a storied history.

It began on March 28, 1919, when a group of notable Dayton residents signed letters of incorporation to establish what was then known as the Dayton Museum of Arts. Over the next 100 years, the museum would also serve as an art school, educating generations of students, and house countless treasures and artifacts.

It’s been 45 years since an outbreak of dangerous storms produced nearly 150 tornadoes across the U.S. and Canada over a 24 hour period.  Reports say during one short period more than a dozen tornadoes were on the ground simultaneously. The storms claimed the lives of hundreds of people and injured thousands more. It was a day in 1974 that Xenia residents never forgot. 

 

Several local manufacturers are once again partnering with area youth for an event aimed at lighting the fires of ingenuity in those young people and get them interested in STEM sciences and skilled trades. 

The program, called Xtreme STEM, was founded by Steve Staub with Staub Manufacturing Solutions in Dayton and several other local companies. 

The first of several medical marijuana dispensaries is about a month away from opening for business in Springfield. Pure Ohio Wellness LLC would be the first to open in Southwest Ohio. 

A few other dispensaries are already operating in other parts of the state. Some Dayton addiction centers say they have concerns as the dispensaries begin operations.

In 1942 at the age of 23, an American citizen named Fred Korematsu experienced something that still reverberates in the legal world today.

The United States government arrested and jailed Korematsu after he refused to go willingly to an incarceration camp for Japanese Americans. The camps, more commonly referred to as internment camps, were established through an executive order by then-Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt, and existed from 1942 to 1945.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Rep. Mike Turner (R-Dayton) is advising Dayton officials not to hold any counter-protests when a KKK-affiliated group assembles on Courthouse Square on May 25.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an Indiana group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an out-of-state group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

Last month, Montgomery County, which oversees Courthouse Square, granted the Indiana group believed to be affiliated with the KKK permission to rally on May 25th.

With just weeks to go before the tax filing deadline of April 15, many Americans are  expressing surprise over the size of their tax refunds, with many taxpayers finding their federal returns are lower than they were in previous years. Some people who are used to getting a refund are finding they’ll owe the IRS instead this year.

Early on Wednesday, the Montgomery County Fairgrounds was transformed into the aftermath of a terror attack. The scene was part of a special public health training designed to give Miami Valley first responders a chance to practice for a real-world attack. The exercise harnessed an army of actors to simulate what might happen after a chemical, biological, or nuclear strike.

Dayton water officials say they’re waiting for high river levels to drop before they can determine the cause of a massive water main break more than a week ago.

The break in a pipe under the Great Miami River affected residents and businesses across the region and led to the loss of millions of gallons of treated drinking water.

It’s unclear when crews would be able to complete evaluations of the water main rupture.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

The city of Dayton is asking a group associated with the Ku Klux Klan to reconsider its request for a permit to rally in the city.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) visited Dayton on Wednesday to meet with more than 20 local business leaders and state legislators about workforce development. Portman is promoting a number of measures aimed at connecting highly skilled workers with open jobs around the state.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Last week we told you how, some Dayton groups, including Rainbow Elder Care, Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County, and Boonshoft Pride are collecting data to gauge the unique needs of the older LGBT community. Our story featured three people who had genuine concerns about their futures as they get older. In our conversations we also talked about other aspects of their lives….. Coming out to family and friends, and to themselves. We talked about the ideals of community and culture, and so we wanted to share just a little bit more of their stories with you. This segment features Janice James, Joyce Gibbs and Dickie Wilson.


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