Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Police and other law enforcement officers come into contact with a lot of people. That puts them more at risk in lots of ways. And now, they’re at risk from the coronavirus.

The Center for Disease Control and the Ohio Department of Health have issued new guidelines for law enforcement officers.

Trooper Sheldon Goodrum, with the Ohio State Highway Patrol, says the guidelines are really just an enhancement of the health and safety protocols they already use every day.

On Sunday, March 8, 2020, Antioch College will continue their arts series called SOUND ACTION. The series, which began in January, is being curated by Catalina Jordan Alvarez, Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Arts.

“These are public events that my students participate in, but the public is also invited to,” says Alverez.

Over the past several weeks, the stock markets have been experiencing some heavy swings. For those of us who are starting to keep a closer eye on our investments and retirement funds, these swings can be pretty concerning.

In just the past week alone, the Dow Jones Industrial Index experienced its largest single gain in history. Then it declined on Tuesday — followed by a huge upswing again on Wednesday. Thursday, at market close the Dow was down almost 970 points.

It’s not often that we touch on stories like that of 10-year-old Takoda Collins. The boy, abused both physically and sexually for years, died back in December.

Since then, Takoda’s father has been arrested, along with two other women living in the home. And it’s been revealed that, despite numerous complaints from teachers and others over the years, the police, courts and children's services across multiple jurisdictions were not able to connect — at least, not in time to save Takoda’s life.

Polly Parks and Karen Bocko are founders of a group called Takoda’s Call.

On March 7, 2020, the Dayton Area League of Women Voters will host an event commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, as well as the 100th anniversary of the League of Women Voters, established in 1920.

This year, the League has selected journalist and author Susan Page as their keynote speaker. Page is the author of The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty. She is also the Washington Bureau Chief for USA Today, and appears as a political analyst on ABC's This Week, CBS Face the Nation, Fox News Sunday and NBC’s Meet the Press.

With the decennial United States Census mailings just weeks away, census organizers are ramping up community outreach efforts across the country.  

At a small gathering at the Dayton Metro Library, hosted by Ohio and Pennsylvania census officials Tuesday, U.S. Census Bureau representatives stressed the importance of a full count, calling it, "the most important endeavor we’ll undergo as a nation for the next 10 years.” 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered her State of the City Address Wednesday morning. Over the course of a half hour, Whaley made numerous references to the tribulations of 2019 — the KKK rally, Memorial Day Tornadoes, and the mass shooting that left nine dead. Yet, much of the mayor’s focus was on what Daytonians have accomplished together.

Last year in her State of the City address Mayor Whaley said Dayton had some tough issues to address — disparities in opportunity among neighborhoods, and the need for more investment in the city’s west side.

A coalition of organizations formed after the Memorial Day tornado outbreak gathered on Thursday to provide updates on disaster recovery progress.

The Miami Valley Long Term Recovery Operations Group says 724 individuals, families and businesses are receiving case management services. Most of those cases are in Montgomery County, according to Laura Mercer, the group’s executive director.   

“About half of those are homeowners. And about 68 percent of those homeowners have indicated that they're going to need some assistance with repair and rebuilding,” Mercer said.

A former director of Dayton’s Minority Business Assistance Center has pleaded guilty to a federal corruption charge.

RoShawn Winburn entered the plea in federal court today in Dayton.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Ohio, in 2015 and 2016 Winburn disclosed internal information regarding disadvantaged business contracts to a local business owner who hoped to obtain contracts with the City of Dayton.

Winburn was charged with accepting cash payments totaling more than $6,500 in exchange for the documents.

In January, a new health care facility opened in Centerville that focuses on individualized supportive care for people living with chronic illness.

On a recent tour of the 36,000 square foot facility, Pure Health Care President Anthony Evans tells me their mission includes maximizing their clients' quality of life and empowering them to thrive and succeed.

On Sunday night, Yellow Springs filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar won the Oscar for this year’s best feature-length documentary for their film "American Factory."

The film is an inside look at the Chinese-owned Fuyao auto glass factory in Moraine. It explores tough issues, including workers rights, intercultural communications, and the differences between American and Chinese management styles and work ethics.

During their acceptance speech, Bognar congratulated the “tough, inventive, great people of Dayton Ohio.”

Investigations into the death of 10-year-old Takoda Collins are continuing. Despite years of alleged abuse by his father, Al Mclean, and complaints from school officials, Mclean removed the boy from school in order to homeschool him. Now, some people are saying it’s time for Ohio to change its homeschooling laws. They say Takoda’s case is a wake-up call - and changes in state law are necessary in order to protect students who are at risk of child abuse - and who are removed from school. To discover more on the ins and outs of homeschooling, and what protections are in place for children at risk, we spoke with Milton Gaither, a professor at Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Gaither has written extensively on homeschooling in America and is the author of the book “Homeschool: An American History.”


Investigations into the death of 10-year-old Takoda Collins are continuing. Despite years of alleged abuse by his father, Al Mclean, and complaints from school officials, Mclean removed the boy from school in order to homeschool him.

Now, some people are saying it’s time for Ohio to change its homeschooling laws. They say Takoda’s case is a wake-up call — and changes in state law are necessary in order to protect students who are at risk of child abuse.

Former Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams was sentenced in U. S. District Court on Wednesday to 12 months in prison.

Williams plead guilty in September 2019 to bribery related to government services. He will also have to pay $28,000 in restitution as part of his sentence.

The bribery charge stems from a 2015 deal in which Williams accepted more than $35,000 in cash benefits and a free home patio construction project.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed a bill into law on Monday that will make it easier for military spouses to work in the state.

Senate Bill 7 mandates that state agencies issue licenses or certificates if military members or their spouses are already licensed to work in another state.

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